Comparing abortion limits in the U.S. against other countries

The Washington Post, in an effort that I’m sure took more energy and time than it looks, compared U.S. abortion laws against those in other countries:

In the last three decades, countries around the world have made it easier to legally get an abortion. In some parts of the United States, however, it’s gotten harder. Just this month, Mexico’s supreme court ruled to decriminalize the practice. Argentina’s Senate legalized abortion in December. Meanwhile, New Zealand, Thailand and Ireland have all taken steps to ease abortion restrictions in recent years.

Hm.

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Visual guide for protecting your home from wildfire

Aaron Steckelberg and Tik Root for The Washington Post provide a visual guide on how to protect your home from wildfire. It starts with an ember floating carefree in the air, and then the tour highlights actions you can take.

Can’t wait for the guides on how to protect your home from flooding and/or how to dress for extreme temperatures.

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Using rates for more relatable Covid-19 numbers

With millions of Covid-19 deaths worldwide, and hundreds of thousands in the US, the absolute counts have been a challenge to relate to for a while. The Washington Post leaned into rates to communicate scale at the individual level. 1 in 500 Americans died from Covid-19 so far.

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Maps of racial population change

Using their peaks and valleys metaphor, The Washington Post shows the shift in racial population between 2010 and 2020. The open triangles, one for each county, show population with width, population growth with height, and fastest-growing race or ethnicity with color.

You might recognize the form from the Post’s 2016 election results, but there’s a small wrinkle when you look at the breakdowns for individual groups. The triangles flip upside down for where population decreased.

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Where America is expanding in developed areas

Zach Levitt and Jess Eng for The Washington Post mapped newly developed areas in the contiguous United States, between 2001 and 2019:

Between 2001 and 2019, the built-up landscape of America — buildings, roads and other structures — has expanded into previously undeveloped areas, adding more than 14,000 square miles of new development across the contiguous United States — an area over five times the size of Delaware.

My favorite part is the interactive map, which lets you see development in your area. The purple indicating newly developed areas against the grayscale provides a quick reference.

The maps are based on data from the United States Geological Survey, which you can grab here.

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Age range of Olympians

Bonnie Berkowitz and Artur Galocha go with the strip plot to show the distribution of age for different Olympic events. If it’s longevity you’re looking for, go for the equestrian, sailing, shooting, and archery events. There’s still time.

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New Olympic sports explained

The 2020 Summer Olympics are here, so ’tis the season for experimental visual explainers. The Washington Post uses a combination of illustration, video, and augmented reality to show off three new Olympic sports: skateboarding, surfing, and sport climbing.

The skateboarding piece with Heimana Reynolds uses a left-right hover to move back and forth through a time-lapse. It lets you see each part of the trick, which can be a challenge to see in real-time. The climbing piece with Brooke Raboutou employs AR so that you can place a 3-D model of the 50-foot wall and Raboutou in your living room for scale. Neat.

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Case rates adjusted for the unvaccinated

Covid-19 cases in the United States were down, but they’re moving up again, mostly among the unvaccinated. Dan Keating and Leslie Shapiro for The Washington Post break down the comparisons by state.

A difference chart for each state shows the overall rate compared against an adjusted rate for the unvaccinated population. As you might expect, the rate for the latter is always higher.

There are three more points of reference. A dotted line shows the adjusted national rate, a black dashed line shows how the current rate is a step back to a previous time, and a smaller, zoomed out version of the chart in the top right provides context back to March 2020. You can see it for cases, deaths, and hospitalizations.

Getting vaccinated strongly appears to be the way to go any way you cut it.

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Case rates adjusted for the unvaccinated

Covid-19 cases in the United States were down, but they’re moving up again, mostly among the unvaccinated. Dan Keating and Leslie Shapiro for The Washington Post break down the comparisons by state.

A difference chart for each state shows the overall rate compared against an adjusted rate for the unvaccinated population. As you might expect, the rate for the latter is always higher.

There are three more points of reference. A dotted line shows the adjusted national rate, a black dashed line shows how the current rate is a step back to a previous time, and a smaller, zoomed out version of the chart in the top right provides context back to March 2020. You can see it for cases, deaths, and hospitalizations.

Getting vaccinated strongly appears to be the way to go any way you cut it.

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Rise of K-pop

K-pop seems to be inescapable these days, which really confuses me. Marian Liu, Youjin Shin, and Shelly Tan for The Washington Post explored the rise in popularity and what makes the songs and artists so popular.

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