3-D rendering of Dixie fire smoke clouds

The New York Times used radar data to create a 3-D model of the Dixie fire smoke clouds:

The raw data was collected every 10 minutes in radial sweeps around the radar stations, each at a higher altitude. The Times combined and reformatted the data using Py-ART, a collection of algorithms and utilities used regularly in radar analysis. We then filtered it to reduce noise.

We applied color and texture to the 3-D volume to approximate a smoke- and cloud-like look. And we interpolated the sequence in time to create a smoother video animation.

The data comes from the NOAA Next Generation Radar (seems to be down right now), and the rendering was inspired by Neil Lareau’s more barebones chart.

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Simulating how just a little gender bias in the workplace can lead to big effects up the chain

Yuhao Du, Jessica Nordell, and Kenneth Joseph used simulations to study the effects of small gender biases at entry level up to executive level. It doesn’t take much to skew the distribution. For NYT Opinion, Yaryna Serkez shows the simulation in action with moving bubbles and stacked area charts for each work level.

The simulation imagines a company where female performance is undervalued by 3 percent. Each dot represents an employee, and they either move up with promotions or stay still. The distribution of men and women start even but end very uneven.

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Bitcoin power usage

You might have heard that Bitcoin uses a lot of electricity. More than some countries. You might have wondered how that could be possible. The New York Times explains with a set of graphics and illustrations.

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Tracking wildfires in the west

Wildfires continue to burn in the western United States. The New York Times provides a tracker showing the ones burning now, along with air quality and a smoke forecast.

A couple of weeks ago, it smelled of smoke in my area and the sky was orange. I guess this is the new norm.

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Tracking wildfires in the west

Wildfires continue to burn in the western United States. The New York Times provides a tracker showing the ones burning now, along with air quality and a smoke forecast.

A couple of weeks ago, it smelled of smoke in my area and the sky was orange. I guess this is the new norm.

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Diversity within the Asian population

Robert Gebeloff, Denise Lu and Miriam Jordan for The New York Times looked at overall increases and variation within the Asian population:

North Dakota, South Dakota, Texas, North Carolina and Indiana are among states that experienced major growth in the past decade. And people of Asian descent have been settling in ever larger numbers in states like West Virginia, where the overall population has declined.

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Inflation isn’t that exciting

For NYT Opinion, Josh Bivens and Stuart A. Thompson argue that you don’t need to panic about inflation:

It may surprise many Americans that even during times of strong growth and very low inflation (like the late 1990s) or weak growth and low inflation (like the years following the Great Recession), more than half of all goods and services are usually experiencing price increases. In part, this is because it is awfully hard for employers to cut nominal wages, even in a recession. And economists see some mild, steady economy-wide inflation as a sign of a healthy economy. The Fed, for instance, actively targets an average overall inflation level of 2 percent per year.

I like the mini visual cues in the body text so that you don’t have to scroll or refer back to the full chart to see what they’re talking about.

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How vaccines can make a difference with the Delta variant

We see percentages for the vaccinated and unvaccinated, and people can easily misinterpret or miscommunicate the results. It’s especially problematic when people are actively trying to confirm misconceptions. For The New York Times, Lauren Leatherby tries to make things clearer imagining two groups: one that is 20% vaccinated and one that is 95% vaccinated.

Vaccines work.

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Shift in white population vs. people of color

The New York Times go with the angled arrows to show the shifts in racial population. The red-orange arrows show an increase in the share of white population, and the teal arrows show an increase in the share of people of color. Longer arrows mean a greater percentage point change.

Whereas The Washington Post focused more on the changes for each demographic individually, NYT focused more on how two broad groups compared.

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How countries ranked by Olympic medal counts

Ranking countries by medal count change depending on how much value you place on each medal. Should you just count number of medals straight up, or should you give more weight for gold than for silver or bronze? Josh Katz for The New York Times revamped his 2018 interactive for 2020 results, which lets you assign different weights to see how the overall rankings change.

The United States took first and China second, but there are many rank combinations among the rest.

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