Two new positions: Senior Statistical Geneticist and Bioinformatician

Two new positions are available in my Infectious Disease Genomics group at the Big Data Institute, University of Oxford.

A Senior Postdoctoral Statistical Geneticist to jointly lead the implementation, design and application of new statistical tools for genome-wide association studies, lead the biological interpretation of key findings, develop methodologies and supervise junior group members. This post would suit a candidate with a PhD and relevant post-doctoral experience including direct experience in statistical genetics. Candidates without post-doctoral experience may be considered for a less senior appointment.

A Bioinformatician to provide expertise for computationally intensive analyses including genome-wide association studies and RNAseq studies of differential gene expression, as well as contributing to informatics projects as part of a wider collaboration with national biomedical cohorts. This post would suit a candidate with either a post-graduate degree related to Bioinformatics, Statistics, and Computing or equivalent experience in industry.

The application deadline for both posts is Noon GMT on Friday 7th January 2022.

Enhancing detection of newborn screening conditions via data analytics

Enhancing detection of newborn screening conditions via data analytics | www.APHLblog.org

For over 50 years, newborn screening programs across the United States have implemented laboratory screening and follow-up programs to detect and report infants at high risk for rare diseases. As we look towards the future, current testing challenges will likely become more pronounced with the anticipated addition of new conditions to the Recommended Uniform Screening Panel (RUSP), increasing sophistication of testing platforms and methodologies, and greater complexity of biomarker profiles.

Building the data analytic capacity of newborn screening programs will help support the analysis and interpretation of patient data, providing tools and resources to create efficiencies in time-intensive program activities.

APHL and the Newborn Screening and Molecular Biology Branch of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) are exploring solutions aimed at improving the interpretation of laboratory tests by expanding data analytic capacity in the following ways:

  • Increasing state newborn screening programs’ capacity to evaluate and interpret laboratory test data by providing Newborn Screening Bioinformatics Fellows
  • Creating a Newborn Screening Data Analytic Workgroup focused on sharing and harmonizing best practices and solutions
  • Enhancing data-driven decision making in the newborn screening community by designing and developing data science resources to address newborn screening-specific data challenges

In March 2019, APHL and CDC hosted a national meeting in Atlanta, GA to broaden their efforts, engage state newborn screening programs in a collective data analytics initiative, and discuss progress toward enhanced disease detection utilizing improved data analytics resources and technologies specific to newborn screening.

The meeting provided a forum for participants to discuss the needs around biochemical and molecular screening methodologies and their related data analytics requirements, as well as the value of data to improving health outcomes.

This national dialogue will help guide CDC development of an in-house data analytics resource that will improve the interpretation of biochemical and molecular test results.

This activity was supported by Cooperative Agreement #NU60OE000103-04 funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Its contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of CDC or the Department of Health and Human Services.

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Lab Culture Ep. 17: Exploring bioinformatics: From fellow to full time in Virginia

Lab Culture Ep. 17: Exploring bioinformatics: From fellow to full time in Virginia | www.APHLblog.org

Kevin Libuit went from the APHL-CDC Bioinformatics Fellowship to a contractor to working full-time as a bioinformatician at the Virginia state lab (VA Division of Consolidated Laboratory Services (DCLS)). First he talks about when he discovered bioinformatics as a field and how the fellowship propelled his career. Then Kevin takes the mic and interviews Dr. Denise Toney, director of Virginia DCLS, about the value and growing need for bioinformaticians in public health labs.

 

 

Kevin G. Libuit, M.S.
Bioinformatics Lead Scientist, Division of Consolidated Laboratory Services (DCLS), Virginia Department of General Services

Denise Toney, PhD
Director, Division of Consolidated Laboratory Services (DCLS), Virginia Department of General Services

Links:

APHL-CDC Fellowships

APHL-CDC Bioinformatics Fellowships

Virginia Division of Consolidated Laboratory Services (DCLS)

APHL Off the Bench (new Facebook group!)

 

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NIH Data Science Collaborative Hackathon April 16 – 18, 2018

The NCBI will assist with a data science hackathon to take place on the NIH Campus in Bethesda, Maryland, from April 16-18, 2018. The hackathon will focus on tools for advanced analysis of biomedical datasets including text, images, next generation … Continue reading

Bioinformatics paper uses NCBI open data to analyze drug response

A study (PMID: 28158543) published in the July 2017 issue of Bioinformatics collects, classifies and analyzes single nucleotide variants (SNVs) that may affect response to currently approved drugs. They identified 2,640 SNVs of interest, most of which occur rarely in populations (minor … Continue reading

North Carolina Research Triangle Hackathon March 12-14, 2018

The UNC Curriculum in Bioinformatics and Computational Biology and NCBI will host a data science hackathon from March 12-14, 2018 on the campus of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Projects addressed during the hackathon will involve general … Continue reading

NCBI to assist in Southern California genomics hackathon in January

From January 10-12, 2018, the NCBI will help with a bioinformatics hackathon in Southern California hosted by San Diego State University. The hackathon will focus on advanced bioinformatics analysis of next generation sequencing data, proteomics, and metadata. This event is … Continue reading