All the passes in soccer visualized at once

This is a fun soccer graphic by Karim Douïeb. It shows 882,536 passes from 890 matches across various leagues and seasons. It looks cool as a static point cloud, but be sure to check out the animated, interactive version which lets you isolate the view to specific parts of the field.

It reminds me of the Windows 3.1 fireworks screensaver. Those were the days.

You can find the data via StatsBomb, in case you want to play around.

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Myth of the Asian American model minority, explained with charts

Asian Americans are often viewed as a “model minority”, but when you look, just a little bit closer, the tag doesn’t fit. Connie Hanzhang Jin for NPR breaks it down in a set of six charts.

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Where chess pieces are most often captured

Reddit user desfirsit made heatmaps to show where on the chess board pieces are usually captured. The top two rows are for black pieces, and the bottom row is for white pieces.

I’m no chess player, but this seems to look right? The frequency of captures appears to agree with movement patterns. Although I’m surprised that the queen, despite having the most freedom of movement, is often captured in the same place. But like I said, I’m no chess player.

You can grab the data from Lichess, which provides data for millions of chess games.

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Where chess pieces are most often captured

Reddit user desfirsit made heatmaps to show where on the chess board pieces are usually captured. The top two rows are for black pieces, and the bottom row is for white pieces.

I’m no chess player, but this seems to look right? The frequency of captures appears to agree with movement patterns. Although I’m surprised that the queen, despite having the most freedom of movement, is often captured in the same place. But like I said, I’m no chess player.

You can grab the data from Lichess, which provides data for millions of chess games.

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Colors of Bob Ross explored

Connor Rothschild charted all the colors Bob Ross used in The Joy of Painting:

Most commonly, paintings have 12 colors. Of the 403 pieces in The Joy of Painting, 100 used 12 colors.

The peak is concentrated around 12, meaning most of Ross’ paintings used somewhere in the range of 7-13 colors; very rarely did they venture outside of that range.

Grab the data here, which was collected by Jared Wilber.

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Hospitalization rates for the unvaccinated

Overall, Covid-19 cases and hospitalizations are down in the United States, but much of that is from vaccinations. When you look at only those who are not vaccinated, the rates are still high in many areas of the country. Dan Keating and Leslie Shapiro for The Washington Post show the differences.

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How perception can save lives

Visualization and perception researcher Lace Padilla was on the kid-centric show Mission Unstoppale to talk about visualizing uncertainty:

I approve of this message.

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Most common professional marriages

Susie Neilson for the San Francisco Chronicle compared the marriage of professions in San Francisco against the national average. As you might expect, there were a lot of programmers:

Perhaps unsurprisingly, the most common union between two professionals here is between a computer programmer and … another computer programmer. Our estimates show that an estimated 1% of all marriages in the region are between two software developers — specifically developers of applications and systems software. For the U.S. overall, software developer unions make up less than one-tenth of a percent of all marriages.

Back in 2017, I made similar comparisons nationally. I like this local angle. Also, maybe I should look at the most recent numbers.

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Historical shifts in where people live

The places in the United States with the highest populations weren’t always like that. There were shifts over decades. With the recent Census release for state populations, Harry Stevens and Nick Kirkpatrick for The Washington Post go all in with a series of bump charts to show the changes in state population rankings since 1920.

They point out historical markers along the way, split it up by region, and provide an explorer at the end to look at your states of interest. In the end, it all comes down to weather and air conditioning.

Still deciding what I think about those gradient connections.

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Rankings for YouTube video greetings

If you’ve watched even just a few videos on YouTube, you probably noticed that many videos, especially those in the vlogging genre, start the same way: “Hey guys.” YouTube Culture & Trends confirms this. “What’s up” and “Good morning” currently take the second and third spots.

They also looked at how it ranks against other greetings and varies with different genres. Sports videos most commonly start with “What is going” (I assume followed by “on”) and tech starts with “Ladies and gentlemen.”

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