Rate of change in Covid-19 cases

We’re all familiar with the Covid-19 line charts that show cases over time, which highlights absolute counts. There are peaks. There are some valleys. Emory Parker for STAT shifted the focus to how quickly the rate is changing, or acceleration, to emphasize which direction rates are headed.

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Case rates adjusted for the unvaccinated

Covid-19 cases in the United States were down, but they’re moving up again, mostly among the unvaccinated. Dan Keating and Leslie Shapiro for The Washington Post break down the comparisons by state.

A difference chart for each state shows the overall rate compared against an adjusted rate for the unvaccinated population. As you might expect, the rate for the latter is always higher.

There are three more points of reference. A dotted line shows the adjusted national rate, a black dashed line shows how the current rate is a step back to a previous time, and a smaller, zoomed out version of the chart in the top right provides context back to March 2020. You can see it for cases, deaths, and hospitalizations.

Getting vaccinated strongly appears to be the way to go any way you cut it.

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Case rates adjusted for the unvaccinated

Covid-19 cases in the United States were down, but they’re moving up again, mostly among the unvaccinated. Dan Keating and Leslie Shapiro for The Washington Post break down the comparisons by state.

A difference chart for each state shows the overall rate compared against an adjusted rate for the unvaccinated population. As you might expect, the rate for the latter is always higher.

There are three more points of reference. A dotted line shows the adjusted national rate, a black dashed line shows how the current rate is a step back to a previous time, and a smaller, zoomed out version of the chart in the top right provides context back to March 2020. You can see it for cases, deaths, and hospitalizations.

Getting vaccinated strongly appears to be the way to go any way you cut it.

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Updates on SARS-CoV-2 resources and cloud data services at ASV 2021

NCBI staff will be presenting  talks and a poster on accessing SARS-CoV-2 at NCBI and in the Cloud at the American Society of Virology 2021 virtual conference, July 19-23, 2021. Presentations July 19, 2021, 6:00PM to 9:30PM, Epidemiology and Public Health Eneida Hatcher, Ph.D.,  will present ‘Providing an easy-to-use, graphics driven interface for normalized public SARS-CoV-2 … Continue reading Updates on SARS-CoV-2 resources and cloud data services at ASV 2021

Slowing and then renewed interest in getting vaccinated

When countries gained access to vaccines, there was an initial burst of vaccinations, but the rate leveled off in most places. Then a variant arrives, and an incentive or another push for vaccinations increases the rate. Reuters looks at the rate shift in different countries, in the context of trying to reach 70 percent vaccinated.

The set of difference charts took me a minute to digest, but then seems straightforward after. More orange fill means much slower than the initial vaccination rate, and more green fill means a bigger bump after a lull.

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India vaccine procurement compared to other countries

Prasanta Kumar Dutta and Manas Mishra reporting for Reuters on the slow rollout of Covid-19 vaccinations in India:

Compared to many Western countries, India was late in procuring vaccines. Modi’s government placed the first advance order for an unapproved vaccine only this month, after being criticised for being slow. Countries including the United States and Britain signed orders last year.

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Hospitalization rates for the unvaccinated

Overall, Covid-19 cases and hospitalizations are down in the United States, but much of that is from vaccinations. When you look at only those who are not vaccinated, the rates are still high in many areas of the country. Dan Keating and Leslie Shapiro for The Washington Post show the differences.

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Four types of people who prevent full vaccination

The United States vaccination rate was rolling for a while there, but it has slowed down. Sema Sgaier for NYT Opinion talks about why that is, breaking it down to four general types of people who are hesitant or don’t plan on getting vaccinated:

After conducting a national survey of U.S. adults, we grouped people into distinct profiles based on their shared beliefs and barriers to getting the vaccine. This approach, borrowed from the marketing world, is called psychobehavioral segmentation. It will allow health officials to target their strategies in ways that ignore demographic categories, like age and race. In the United States, we used this approach to identify five distinct personas: the Enthusiasts, the Watchful, the Cost-Anxious, the System Distrusters and the Covid Skeptics.

The last two groups will be harder to convince, but for the watchful and cost-anxious, I hope they look at the numbers.

The risk of side effects is very low (especially when you compare to the everyday things we do to live), your risk of infection or hospitalization goes way down when you get vaccinated, and you don’t have to pay anything.

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Coping with the big numbers

Connie Jin, who works for NPR and updates a Covid-19 dashboard, talks about in comic-form feeling numb to the large numbers and hot to deal. It comes back to the individual.

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Map of people moving during pandemic

It was only a matter of time before someone showed dots moving across a map to show migration during the pandemic. Again, using USPS change of address data, Yan Wu and Luis Melgar for the Wall Street Journal (paywalled) showed where people moved in the country.

As shown through other views, a lot of the movement wasn’t out of the ordinary, but in some areas — mainly San Francisco and New York — the pandemic appeared to motivate people a little more to move.

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