Money distribution for streaming music

From the listener perspective, we pay our monthly or annual fees and just turn on our music streams. The path those fees take from our wallet to musicians is less straightforward. For The Pudding, Elio Quinton does a good job of visually explaining where the money goes (and some of the better ways you can support artists).

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Money distribution for streaming music

From the listener perspective, we pay our monthly or annual fees and just turn on our music streams. The path those fees take from our wallet to musicians is less straightforward. For The Pudding, Elio Quinton does a good job of visually explaining where the money goes (and some of the better ways you can support artists).

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History of heat records in major U.S. cities

Matt Daniels and Russell Goldenberg for The Pudding are tracking heat records in 400 cities in the United States. Choose a city, see if yesterday was a record, and find out how it measures up against past records over time.

I wonder if this is one of those times it might’ve been better to make a series of graphics instead of adhering to a single form and transitioning between views. I got a little lost in the noise initially.

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Examination of songs after virality on TikTok

Vox, in collaboration with The Pudding, looked at what happens when a song goes viral on TikTok. It heads down the TikTok-to-Spotify pipeline, which signals money to be made and draws labels to take advantage.

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A test for a potentially flawed study on randomness and age

In 2017, a study posited that human behavior complexity peaks at age 25 and then declines, especially after age 60. The researchers estimated complexity through people’s ability to make up random patterns. Russell Goldenberg and Arjun Kakkar, for The Pudding, let you put the theory to the test and discuss why the original researcher’s findings were questionable.

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Redrafting the NBA, based on past player performance

With the NBA playoffs underway, it can be fun to watch the best players and wonder what it’d be like if they were drafted earlier by a different team. For The Pudding, Russell Goldenberg did this for every player and team since the 1989 draft. Goldenberg made a similar thing five years ago, but this time there’s a team component.

Another five years from now, in Redraft 3.0, I fully expect “better” picks to also consider the team makeup at the time of drafting. For example, check if it makes sense to draft another power forward when you already have a star power forward and need a shooting guard.

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Days since record-high temperatures

Here’s a fun/alarming weather map from The Pudding. Using data from the Applied Climate Information System, they show the number of days since a record-high temperature in hundreds of U.S. cities. The counters are in the style of those signs in factories that show days since the last injury.

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More readable writing illustrated with more readable writing

For The Pudding, Rebecca Monteleone and Jamie Brew (with design and code by Michelle McGhee) describe the advantages of more readable writing and how we measure readability. The best part is that they demonstrate with two versions of text. Switch paragraph-by-paragraph to see how an explanation is made more clear with simpler words and sentence structure.

This is what I was trying to get at with last week’s Process newsletter but much better.

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Joke machine learning projects to advance your career

In an automated job climate that analyzes resumes and inspects social profiles, it can be a challenge to find the job that’s right for you. Luckily, Jess Peter for The Pudding put together a satirical set of tools to combat the recruiting bots. Generate a fake resume with a specified level of experience, define a profile pic for your socials, and then use that fake image of your face for the video interview.

I wonder if someone has ever done this in real life. This had to have happened at least once, right?

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Tracking the Lenna image

If you’ve taken classes that cover image processing, you’ve likely come across the Lenna image. It’s a headshot of Lena Forsén taken from Playboy Magazine in 1972. For The Pudding, Jennifer Ding, with Jan Diehm and Michelle McGhee, looked at use of the image in research over the years — despite copyright claims and Forsén’s wish for researchers to move on to a different image.

Ding used a straightforward bar chart to show the pattern over time, but the annotation provides a layer of context that tells you what those peaks and valleys mean.

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