Voting gains for 2020, compared to 2016 election

For The New York Times, Ford Fessenden, Lazaro Gamio and Rich Harris go with a Dorling cartogram to look at the votes gained per county in the 2020 election, compared against the 2016 election.

As you’d expect, voting overall was up just about everywhere this year. Some counties shifted left. Some shifted right. The key points of interest come about when the the map starts zooming into specific regions.

See also: the election wind map.

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Recap of all the election maps and charts

Alan McConchie from Stamen recaps the wide array of maps and charts that came out before, during, and after election night:

This year we saw continued refinement of traditional election maps styles, and an exciting (and nerve-wracking) new frontier developed with the visualization of post-election ballot counting. Dataviz practitioners are struggling with challenges of how to show uncertainty and how much uncertainty can be shown while still making our visualizations clean and easy to understand. Election cartographers are dealing with their own dilemma of how much to show the polarization and inequality that currently exists in our electoral system (with the risk of reinforcing it) versus making counterfactual maps of systems that could or should be.

[via Co.Design]

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Votes that won the presidency

Voter turnout this election was higher than it’s been in a long time, but the winner margins were still small. Alyssa Fowers, Atthar Mirza and Armand Emamdjomeh for The Washington Post showed the margins with dots. Each circle represents 3,000 votes, and the blue and red circles represent by how much the candidate won by in a given state.

The dots showing absolute counts are useful to see the scale of each win, which percentages don’t capture.

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Debunking claims of election rigging

There’s a video (one of too many I am sure) going around that “shows” election rigging. Statistician Kristian Lum shows, with good ol’ basic math and R plots, why the “evidence” is what happens during a normal election.

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Red counties mostly stayed red

For The New York Times, Denise Lu and Karen Yourish looked at the red and blue shifts for the counties that voted red in 2016:

President-elect Joseph R. Biden Jr. won the popular vote by more than five million — and his margin is expected to grow as states finish counting. Still, results so far show that President Trump’s support remained strong in most of the counties that voted for him in 2016. Here’s how.

Always enjoy scrollytelling through spaghetti.

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Swings in the battleground states

For The Washington Post, Ashlyn Still and Ted Mellnik show the shifts in the 2020 election compared against the 2012 and 2016 elections. Good use of swooping arrows.

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Wind map to show change in vote shares and participation

The Washington Post goes with a wind metaphor to show the change in voting activity between 2016 and 2020. The up and down direction represents change in turnout, and the left and right direction represents change in vote margin.

A fun riff on the classic Viégas and Wattenberg wind map and the Bostock and Carter election map from 2012.

The Post map is based on this and this code.

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Watch the election percentages for votes counted so far

Still waiting for those results? Bloomberg’s election page for each state shows the estimated range of votes counted so far. Really like the dual encoding with the shaded gradient and line. For example, here’s the page for Pennsylvania.

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Testing voting scenarios while we wait for the counts

As we wait for the votes to be counted in the remaining states, here are a couple of interactives to test the possibilities. The New York Times updated their graphic on all possible paths to the White House (the original from 2012).

FiveThirtyEight also has their thing:

Or, there’s this decision tree by Kerry Rodden:

Or, you could carry on with your day as if nothing is happening and not concern yourself with things that are outside of your control.

Nope. Not gonna do that.

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Election needles are back

The NYT election needles of uncertainty are back, and they’re about to go live (if they haven’t already). I’m not watching, but in case that’s your thing, there you go.

It’s a little different this time around, because of the pandemic and mail-in voting. There’s no national needle this time. Instead, there are three needles for Florida, Georgia, and North Carolina, because they’re battleground states and the necessary data to run the estimates is available.

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