Visualization helping us during the pandemic

Hayleigh Moore for the College of Information Studies at the University of Maryland on visualization and the pandemic:

With new updates developing by the hour amidst the evolving COVID-19 pandemic, trying to grapple at the most relevant information can be overwhelming. Data visualization has helped to synthesize this complex phenomena and shape the timeline of the Coronavirus pandemic that has drastically changed how we go about our daily lives. While commonly used to communicate data to the general population, visualization is now having quite a real-world impact in the face of this crisis.

Visualization the field often struggles with real-world examples for how its work plays a role in people’s lives. There should be no questions about that now.

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Spreading the Word: PLOS Advances Research Through Media Partnerships

Last year, PLOS helped more than 2,300 articles receive media coverage in high-profile outlets including The New York Times, the BBC, National Geographic, Scientific American and The Washington Post. How do we do it? For

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0000-0002-8715-28960000-0001-7318-5892 “In our panel it is the stated and adhered to policy that we will not consider where a paper is published. Rather, in our evaluations we assess its real impact in a field. Change

Getting the Impact Factor Genie Back in the Box

Getting the Impact Factor Genie Back in the Box   Posted June 5, 2017 by Sheryl P. Denker in Uncategorized post-info AddThis Sharing Buttons above 0000-0001-7318-5892 On occasion The Official PLOS Blog presents Thought Leadership

Getting the Impact Factor Genie Back in the Box

0000-0002-8715-28960000-0001-7318-5892 On occasion The Official PLOS Blog presents Thought Leadership interviews with scientists leading the way on issues integral to the transformation of science communication and advancement of Open Science. Previous interviewees include Bruce Alberts

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Many researchers will tell you that financing their work–writing grants, securing funding, and budgeting for varying funding levels year to year–is the least rewarding part of life in academia, but there’s no escaping the simple fact that science costs money. … Continue reading »

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