APHL’s newborn screening program goes global

APHL's Jelili Ojodu receives the the Gerard Loeber Award for Contributions to Newborn Screening Expansion in Developing Countries

Outside of the US and other resource-rich nations, few countries have the capital, infrastructure and human resources required to sustain a newborn screening program. Despite these barriers, APHL staff and members have worked diligently to increase access to newborn screening worldwide. In recognition of these efforts, APHL Newborn Screening and Genetics Director Jelili Ojodu received the Gerard Loeber Award for Contributions to Newborn Screening Expansion in Developing Countries at the tenth in September. The award recognizes years of work by Ojodu and his team at APHL to make newborn screening the norm—not the exception—for babies around the world.

While much remains to be done to achieve this goal, as more countries consider the impact of non-communicable diseases on their populations, interest in newborn screening is growing. In the last year alone, APHL has received requests for technical assistance to develop or expand newborn screening programs from Brazil, Canada, Ghana, Jordan, India, Mexico, Nepal, Nigeria and Tanzania.

Such interest has led APHL to expand partnerships with nonprofits and governmental agencies to develop newborn screening guidance and resources. For example, APHL has collaborated with the Global Issues Working Group of the Sickle Cell Disease Coalition to develop a Global Resource Library with information on sickle cell disease activities worldwide and a public service announcement. In addition, the association worked with other sickle cell disease advocates to create tools to assess a nation’s needs and readiness to develop a sickle cell disease program. APHL is also currently collaborating with the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the CDC Foundation, the Pediatric Endocrine Society and Vanderbilt University Medical Center to finalize a document detailing the capabilities required to launch a newborn screening program.

On the ground, APHL continues to extend its reach within Africa, South America, Europe and Southeast Asia. It supports development of implementation plans and strategies, offers related training and shares recent developments in US newborn screening. For example, APHL recently participated in the first Pan-African Workshop on Newborn Screening in Rabat, Morocco, where delegates reported on the status of newborn screening in their countries, and APHL discussed developing a newborn screening case registry to coordinate patient follow up, and infrastructure required for electronic data exchange of newborn screening results.

The association has also been collaborating with partners in India as that country gears up to implement universal newborn screening—a daunting undertaking in a country where 1.5 million babies are born each month. APHL recently teamed up with PerkinElmer to support newborn screening and genetics training for a fellow from Jaipur, whom APHL staff later visited to assess readiness for newborn screening new disorder implementation and technical assistance in that state. Currently, APHL is developing case studies about the benefits of newborn screening to educate physicians in Jaipur, and, with the International Neonatology Association (ISNS), is coordinating with local NBS leaders to explore opportunities to initiate an ISNS chapter in India.

Despite the challenges of strengthening newborn screening programs in countries where the service is now virtually unknown, Ojodu and his team foresee tremendous benefits to public health as well as national income and stability. Says Ojodu: “When we reduce or eliminate the symptoms of newborn screening disorders, kids are healthier, healthcare costs go down and mothers can take on income-generating work. This raises family income and, when multiplied by millions of families, also raises national income. We get a cascade of benefits from a single investment in public health.”

 

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APHL’s newborn screening program goes global

APHL's Jelili Ojodu receives the the Gerard Loeber Award for Contributions to Newborn Screening Expansion in Developing Countries

Outside of the US and other resource-rich nations, few countries have the capital, infrastructure and human resources required to sustain a newborn screening program. Despite these barriers, APHL staff and members have worked diligently to increase access to newborn screening worldwide. In recognition of these efforts, APHL

While much remains to be done to achieve this goal, as more countries consider the impact of non-communicable diseases on their populations, interest in newborn screening is growing. In the last year alone, APHL has received requests for technical assistance to develop or expand newborn screening programs from Brazil, Canada, Ghana, Jordan, India, Mexico, Nepal, Nigeria and Tanzania.

Such interest has led APHL to expand partnerships with nonprofits and governmental agencies to develop newborn screening guidance and resources. For example, APHL has collaborated with the Global Issues Working Group of the Sickle Cell Disease Coalition to develop a Global Resource Library with information on sickle cell disease activities worldwide and a public service announcement. In addition, the association worked with other sickle cell disease advocates to create tools to assess a nation’s needs and readiness to develop a sickle cell disease program. APHL is also currently collaborating with the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the CDC Foundation, the Pediatric Endocrine Society and Vanderbilt University Medical Center to finalize a document detailing the capabilities required to launch a newborn screening program.

On the ground, APHL continues to extend its reach within Africa, South America, Europe and Southeast Asia. It supports development of implementation plans and strategies, offers related training and shares recent developments in US newborn screening. For example, APHL recently participated in the first Pan-African Workshop on Newborn Screening in Rabat, Morocco, where delegates reported on the status of newborn screening in their countries, and APHL discussed developing a newborn screening case registry to coordinate patient follow up, and infrastructure required for electronic data exchange of newborn screening results.

The association has also been collaborating with partners in India as that country gears up to implement universal newborn screening—a daunting undertaking in a country where 1.5 million babies are born each month. APHL recently teamed up with PerkinElmer to support newborn screening and genetics training for a fellow from Jaipur, whom APHL staff later visited to assess readiness for newborn screening new disorder implementation and technical assistance in that state. Currently, APHL is developing case studies about the benefits of newborn screening to educate physicians in Jaipur, and, with the International Neonatology Association (ISNS), is coordinating with local NBS leaders to explore opportunities to initiate an ISNS chapter in India.

Despite the challenges of strengthening newborn screening programs in countries where the service is now virtually unknown, Ojodu and his team foresee tremendous benefits to public health as well as national income and stability. Says Ojodu: “When we reduce or eliminate the symptoms of newborn screening disorders, kids are healthier, healthcare costs go down and mothers can take on income-generating work. This raises family income and, when multiplied by millions of families, also raises national income. We get a cascade of benefits from a single investment in public health.”

 

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APHL Newborn Screening Systems Quality Improvement Projects Award Recipients Announced

Newborn screening laboratory scientist at work

The Association of Public Health Laboratories (APHL) is pleased to announce the recipients of the Newborn Screening Systems Quality Improvement Projects awards. Funded through a cooperative agreement with Genetic Services Branch of the US Health and Human Services Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), these awards will provide funding to support continuous quality improvement (CQI) initiatives led by state newborn screening programs.

The Newborn Screening Systems Quality Improvement Projects build on the combined success of previous HRSA Maternal and Child Health Bureau funded cooperative agreements for NewSTEPs, NewSTEPs 360 and the NewSTEPs Timeliness Collaborative Improvement and Innovation Network (CoIIN). However, the Newborn Screening Systems Quality Improvement Projects are unique in that agencies are able to identify specific system challenges within their programs and request the funding necessary to work through their challenges using CQI methods. The ultimate goal is to improve their state or territorial newborn screening program thus improving health outcomes for newborns.

A total of 14 project proposals from 12 agencies were selected to participate in the QI projects, with focus areas including newborn screening timeliness, improvements to long- and short- term follow-up, patient and provider education, health information technology (HIT) and improvements to results reporting. These agencies include:

  • Alaska Department of Health and Social Services
  • Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment
  • Georgia Department of Public Health Laboratory
  • Georgia Department of Public Health Laboratory
  • Heluna Health in partnership with the California Department of Health
  • Iowa Department of Public Health
  • Louisiana Office of Public Health Laboratories
  • Minnesota Department of Health
  • New York State Department of Health
  • Puerto Rico Newborn Screening Program
  • Puerto Rico Newborn Screening Program
  • South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control
  • Tennessee Department of Health
  • Virginia Department of General Services/Division of Consolidated Services

In addition to funding support, awardees of the Newborn Screening Systems Quality Improvement Projects participate in a multidisciplinary collaborative network focused on improving newborn screening. They will receive customized coaching and technical assistance on designing and implementing their quality improvement project; support around data and reporting; and opportunities to disseminate their projects to other members of the newborn screening community.

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This program is 100% funded through Cooperative Agreement # UG8MC31893 from the Health Resources and Services Administration. All publications and presentations are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of HRSA.

The Association of Public Health Laboratories (APHL) works to strengthen laboratory systems serving the public’s health in the US and globally. APHL’s member laboratories protect the public’s health by monitoring and detecting infectious and foodborne diseases, environmental contaminants, terrorist agents, genetic disorders in newborns and other diverse health threats.

 

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New Lab Matters: The promise and challenge of newborn screening in 2019

New Lab Matters cover depicts a newborn baby

Newborn screening is a public health success story, ongoing for 56 years. On the one hand, new treatment and laboratory testing options open up the possibility of expanded screening panels. On the other hand, testing laboratories and follow-up providers are generally under-resourced and straining to keep pace with growing workloads. But as our feature article shows, scientists are working diligently to improve the accuracy and precision of existing tests and to bring on new disorders, even as they continue the high-stakes work of screening tens of thousands of infants a year.

Here are just a few of this issue’s highlights:

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Congratulations to 2019 APHL newborn screening award winners

Congratulations to 2019 APHL newborn screening award winners | www.APHLblog.org

At the 2019 Newborn Screening and Genetic Testing Symposium in early April, APHL presented awards to leaders in the field of newborn screening. We commend the exceptional and innovative work of all those who were nominated.

The following awards were given:

George Cunningham Visionary Award in Newborn Screening – This year’s recipient was Ming Chan, PhD, retired director of the Florida Bureau of Public Health Laboratories (BPHL).

Dr. Chan has been influencing newborn screening and laboratory science in the state of Florida since 1972. In that time, under various capacities at the Florida BPHL, Dr. Chan has implemented and overseen numerous advances in environmental chemistry, clinical chemistry, newborn screening and genetic testing, and bacteriology, serology, and virology. Some of his accomplishments include:

  • adopting automation and a Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) for the chemistry section that tracked specimen testing and interfaced analytical equipment for the electronic transfer of results;
  • development and implementation of newborn screening test procedures for the state’s Infant Screening Program in 1979; and
  • early adoption of SCID testing after its addition to the recommended uniform screening panel.

In 2008, he retired as the director of Florida’s BPHL but returned to newborn screening as a consultant to continue ensuring healthy outcomes for infants through early disease detection.

Harry Hannon Laboratory Improvement Award in Newborn Screening – This year’s recipient was Victor Skrinska, PhD, DABCC. Dr. Skrinska is the Head of Section for the metabolic laboratory and the National Newborn Screening Laboratory in Doha, Qatar since 2009.

Dr. Skrinska’s research and method development of homocystinuria screening by way of measuring total homocysteine in dried blood spots using LC-MS/MS increased the accuracy of screening, resulting in timely identification and reporting of cases. He has also spearheaded the expansion of conditions screened in Qatar to include alpha and beta thalassemias, as well as expansion to other newborn screening conditions through the use of second tier screening methods. He has championed quality improvement in the laboratory and has been able to make these achievements independent of any political crises and embargos on his country.

Judi Tuerck Follow Up and Education Award – APHL honored the efforts of two individuals this year: Barbara Ferreira, BSN, Area Service Center Director at Harbor-UCLA in California and Amy Gaviglio, MS, CGC, short-term follow-up supervisor for the Minnesota newborn screening program.

Ms. Ferreira has overseen the screening of more than 20 million babies during her 40 year tenure with the state of California. She has improved and influenced the quality of newborn screening follow-up both nationally and within her state. Her experience has advanced the quality of newborn screening at the national level through her active participation on the Education and Training workgroup of the Advisory Committee on Heritable Disorders in Newborns and Children (ACHDNC) and the document development committee of the Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI). Through participation in APHL’s Collaborative Improvement and Innovation Network and NewSTEPs 360 projects, she implemented measures to improve the timeliness of newborn screening in California.

Amy Gaviglio has been working in newborn screening follow-up in Minnesota for the past 12 years and has been the short-term follow-up supervisor for 10 of those years. She has been intimately involved in Minnesota’s implementation of new disorders, both for screening and for improving the communication of newborn screening results. Ms. Gaviglio has also been a leader in facilitating the initiation and maintenance of screening efforts for critical congenital heart disease in MN, and used this experience to facilitate screening in other states seeking to do the same. She has been instrumental in promoting training for implementation of DNA-based techniques in screening and her expertise has been widely acknowledged through her professional activities at the national level, which include her Vice Chair position for the CLSI Expert Panel on Newborn Screening, membership on the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics ACT sheet workgroup, and membership on ACHDNC’s Education and Training workgroup, as well as numerous APHL committees and workgroups.

Everyday Life Saver Award – For the inaugural presentation of this award, APHL recognized the work and accomplishments of Krystal Baumert, follow-up coordinator for the Nebraska newborn screening program. Ms. Baumert has been working in newborn screening follow-up for over 25 years. Ms. Baumert was involved in the development of one of the first electronic match systems in the country to be able to accurately account for every newborn’s results, and she continues to work with PerkinElmer (Nebraska’s contracted newborn screening laboratory) to develop clear, effective daily reports for monitoring, tracking and follow-up so that none of the babies in Nebraska are lost to follow-up.

Congratulations to all award winners.

This program was supported by Cooperative Agreement # 5NU60OE000103 from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Its contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of CDC or the Department of Health and Human Services.

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Enhancing detection of newborn screening conditions via data analytics

Enhancing detection of newborn screening conditions via data analytics | www.APHLblog.org

For over 50 years, newborn screening programs across the United States have implemented laboratory screening and follow-up programs to detect and report infants at high risk for rare diseases. As we look towards the future, current testing challenges will likely become more pronounced with the anticipated addition of new conditions to the Recommended Uniform Screening Panel (RUSP), increasing sophistication of testing platforms and methodologies, and greater complexity of biomarker profiles.

Building the data analytic capacity of newborn screening programs will help support the analysis and interpretation of patient data, providing tools and resources to create efficiencies in time-intensive program activities.

APHL and the Newborn Screening and Molecular Biology Branch of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) are exploring solutions aimed at improving the interpretation of laboratory tests by expanding data analytic capacity in the following ways:

  • Increasing state newborn screening programs’ capacity to evaluate and interpret laboratory test data by providing Newborn Screening Bioinformatics Fellows
  • Creating a Newborn Screening Data Analytic Workgroup focused on sharing and harmonizing best practices and solutions
  • Enhancing data-driven decision making in the newborn screening community by designing and developing data science resources to address newborn screening-specific data challenges

In March 2019, APHL and CDC hosted a national meeting in Atlanta, GA to broaden their efforts, engage state newborn screening programs in a collective data analytics initiative, and discuss progress toward enhanced disease detection utilizing improved data analytics resources and technologies specific to newborn screening.

The meeting provided a forum for participants to discuss the needs around biochemical and molecular screening methodologies and their related data analytics requirements, as well as the value of data to improving health outcomes.

This national dialogue will help guide CDC development of an in-house data analytics resource that will improve the interpretation of biochemical and molecular test results.

This activity was supported by Cooperative Agreement #NU60OE000103-04 funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Its contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of CDC or the Department of Health and Human Services.

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Lab Culture: Introducing PKU Life Podcast with Kevin Alexander

Introducing: PKU Life Podcast with Kevin Alexander | www.APHLblog.org

Fifty-five years ago, newborn screening was born. At the time, though, that little heel prick was performed to screen for only one condition: phenylketonuria (PKU). Without early intervention, babies born with PKU faced severe cognitive, behavioral and other neurological disorders. The advent of PKU newborn screening allowed health care providers and families to make critical changes to a baby’s diet to prevent those consequences.

TIntroducing: PKU Life Podcast with Kevin Alexander | www.APHLblog.orgoday, December 3, is PKU Awareness Day. It’s hard to say where newborn screening would be without that first PKU test. And 55 years later, it’s hard to say where newborn screening would be without the families and individuals living with PKU who have shared their stories to convey the value of this simple test. One of those individuals is Kevin Alexander.

Kevin has been a leader in the PKU community simply by sharing his story and his experiences living with PKU. He has spoken at conferences and events around the world, created a video documentary about his life, served as a leader and friend to others living with PKU, and now he shares his voice in a new podcast.

For this PKU Awareness Day, we are sharing Kevin’s podcast, PKU Life Podcast with Kevin Alexander. We are so appreciative of Kevin’s willingness to both share with and listen to those in the newborn screening community. Kevin, thank you for your leadership, friendship and generosity!

Listen here or subscribe wherever you listen to podcasts:

 Links:

PKU Life Podcast with Kevin Alexander – Facebook

PKU Life Podcast with Kevin Alexander – Instagram

PKU Life Podcast with Kevin Alexander – Twitter

APHL’s Newborn Screening Program

APHL blog posts about PKU

PKU Awareness Day

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Improving newborn sickle cell screening in Africa: ‘We can affect change there just like we did in the US’

Improving newborn sickle cell screening in Africa: ‘We can affect change there just like we did in the US’ | www.APHLblog.org

by Kim Krisberg

In the US, nearly all children born with sickle cell disease survive into adulthood. Across the globe in sub-Saharan Africa, more than half of babies born with the genetic condition don’t survive until their fifth birthdays.

A major reason for the stark disparity is the region’s lack of newborn screening capacity, which allows for early detection and medical intervention. Here in the US, state public health laboratories automatically test babies for a number of genetic and metabolic disorders, including sickle cell disease, as part of their universal newborn screening programs. In sub-Saharan Africa, however, diagnostic and treatment capacity is severely limited, despite the region being home to more than 75% of the disease’s global burden.

Researchers estimate that about 240,000 babies are born with sickle cell disease in sub-Saharan Africa every year, with studies estimating that at least half of such children die before age five (though research finds the under-five mortality rate related to sickle cell disease in the region could be as high as 90%). Globally, the number of people with sickle cell disease is expected to grow by 30% by 2050. Early detection and diagnosis is critical to pushing that child mortality rate down, but to date, no country in sub-Saharan Africa has been able to establish universal newborn screening for any disease, including sickle cell disease.

Sickle cell disease is an inherited red blood cell disorder in which abnormally shaped red blood cells block the adequate flow of blood and oxygen throughout the body. The disease causes a number of adverse and debilitating effects, including anemia, chronic pain, delayed growth, vision problems and more frequent infections. The disease is manageable with access to relatively easy, low-cost interventions, such as folic acid supplementation, vaccines and antibiotics, pain treatment, dietary changes and high fluid intake.

“This is the same disease we screen for here in the US and we know that if we’re able to detect it early enough and provide the right treatment — prophylaxis penicillin and folic acid — it increases their chances of having a normal life enormously,” says Jelili Ojodu, MPH, director of newborn screening and genetics at APHL. “Sickle cell disease doesn’t have to be a death sentence, as it is now in these countries.”

This summer, the Sickle Cell Disease Coalition — APHL is a member of its steering committee — released a new public service announcement directing viewers to a library of global resources on sickle cell disease screening sites and treatment centers in African regions. Also unveiled was an eight-minute documentary from the American Society of Hematology on sickle cell disease newborn screening efforts now underway in Ghana and how families impacted by sickle cell disease can access appropriate care.

For more than a decade, APHL has been working with providers and health officials in sub-Saharan Africa to institute newborn screening for sickle cell disease, providing technical assistance and guidance on testing methodologies, facilitating relationships with laboratory vendors and in some cases, providing hands-on training in validating lab instruments. The goal, Ojodu said, is to help countries take the first steps in the slow scale-up toward universal newborn screening and foster small pilot projects that expand the evidence base and justification for further investment. For example, in Ghana, where sickle cell disease is endemic, APHL partnered with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Sickle Cell Foundation of Ghana to offer technical assistance on a variety of related screening activities, such as needs assessments, genetic counseling and educating providers and parents. The initiative, launched in 2011, began with a survey of community needs, which revealed a gap in the availability of genetic counselors who specialize in sickle cell disease.

In turn, APHL led a 2013 workshop on developing a sickle cell disease counselor training and certification program in Ghana, where participants helped tailor a culturally competent training program specific to the needs of Ghana’s communities. Then in 2015, APHL put together a curriculum and trained the first 15 counselors using the new Genetic Education and Counseling for Sickle Cell Conditions in Ghana. A second training workshop took place in Ghana in the summer of 2016.

In all, Ojodu said, APHL has worked with providers in about a half-dozen African nations to improve sickle cell disease outcomes and newborn screening, including Mali, Kenya, Nigeria, Liberia, Uganda and Tanzania. The work, he said, has shown that newborn sickle cell disease screening and counseling in sub-Saharan Africa is possible — the real sticking point is securing the funding and support to shift from small pilots at hospitals and universities to population-wide screening. (He added that most sickle cell disease screening in sub-Saharan Africa is happening in hospital labs, which he said might be the preferred setting for such newborn screening in the region, as public health agencies there must focus their limited resources on considerable communicable disease threats.)

In Ghana, Ojodu noted, providers use the same technology to screen for sickle cell disease as labs do in the US, which underscores the adaptability of current sickle cell disease screening techniques to a variety of settings.

“If we can do it here, they can do it there,” Ojodu said. “Of course, it will take time and coordinated efforts. It’s really a slow build-up of justifying that No. 1, this saves lives, and No. 2, it can be done.”

Venée Tubman, MD, MMSc, a member of the African Newborn Screening and Early Intervention Consortium, which came out of the American Society of Hematology’s Sickle Cell Disease Working Group on Global Issues, noted that a number of attempts have been made to start newborn screening programs in sub-Saharan African, but also reported that no country has yet succeeded in adopting a universal screening effort. She noted that based on progress in sickle cell disease survival rates in the US — where about 96% of babies with sickle cell disease now survive into adulthood — it’s reasonable to believe that similar improvements can be achieved for children in sub-Saharan Africa with the expansion of early detection and treatment. For instance, in the US, CDC reports that with the introduction of pneumococcal disease vaccination, sickle cell disease related deaths among black children younger than four dropped by 42% between 1999 and 2002.

“That fact that we were able to implement some basic measures and increase survivability pretty dramatically leads me to believe that, yes, most of these deaths are preventable,” said Tubman, an assistant professor in pediatrics at Baylor College of Medicine.

She added that the existence of the consortium and the Sickle Cell Disease Coalition speaks to the progress being made to boost early detection and intervention in sub-Saharan Africa.

“Even beginning to strategize and organize around this problem — the infrastructure limitations and the myth and perceptions around sickle cell — is a sign of progress,” Tubman said. “We have a long way to go, but at least we’re on the road.”

Ojodu noted that with the elimination of CDC funding for global newborn screening development, APHL is looking for new funding partners to continue its work abroad.

“This is possible,” he said, referring to improving sickle cell disease survivability rates in sub-Saharan Africa. “We can affect change there just like we did in the US.”

 

*Header photo is a screenshot from the Sickle Cell Disease Coalition’s “Global Sickle Cell Disease Public Service Announcement.”

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APHL Receives $7.5 Million Award to Strengthen Newborn Screening Systems

APHL Receives $7.5 Million Award to Strengthen Newborn Screening Systems | www.APHLblog.org

Congratulations to APHL’s Newborn Screening and Genetics team and the NewSTEPs team! Below is the official announcement of the award.

The Association of Public Health Laboratories (APHL) has been awarded a five-year cooperative agreement of up to $7.5 million by the Genetic Services Branch of the US Health and Human Services Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) to maintain and manage the Newborn Screening Technical assistance and Evaluation Program (NewSTEPs). A component of the APHL Newborn Screening and Genetics Program, NewSTEPs provides quality improvement initiatives to strengthen newborn screening systems, a data repository, technical assistance and resources to state newborn screening programs and stakeholders.

“We are honored to receive this award,” said Jelili Ojodu, director of APHL’s Newborn Screening and Genetics Program and director of NewSTEPs. “This funding will allow us to continue provide states with robust and comprehensive tools that will allow them to improve the efficiency of the services they provide to newborn babies.”

Named one of the ten greatest public health achievements of the 20th century, newborn screening saves or improves the lives of more than 12,000 babies annually in the US. For babies who test positive for one of the genetic, metabolic, heart or hearing conditions, newborn screening can prevent serious health problems or even death.

NewSTEPs helps facilitate newborn screening initiatives and improve programmatic outcomes to enhance the quality of the newborn screening system through data driven quality improvements.

 

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This project is 100% supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) as part of an award totaling $1,500,000. The contents are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent the official views of, nor endorsement, by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.

The Association of Public Health Laboratories (APHL) works to strengthen laboratory systems serving the public’s health in the US and globally. APHL’s member laboratories protect the public’s health by monitoring and detecting infectious and foodborne diseases, environmental contaminants, terrorist agents, genetic disorders in newborns and other diverse health threats.

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Lab Culture Ep. 11: What if there were no public health labs?

Lab Culture Ep. 11: What if there were no public health labs? | www.APHLblog.org

Maybe the saying is true: you don’t know what you had until it is gone. For the families in this episode, the absence of public health laboratories turned their worlds upside down and negatively impacted both the present and future. These families represent us all and highlight the vulnerabilities that would exist if there were no public health laboratories working continuously to keep our communities and populations safe.

This is the second episode in the series produced by members of the Emerging Leader Program cohort 10.

You can listen to our show via the player embedded below or on iTunes, Stitcher or wherever you get your podcasts. Please be sure to subscribe to Lab Culture so you never miss an episode.

Lab Culture Ep. 11: What if there were no public health labs? | www.APHLblog.orgEmerging Infectious Disease Response:

APHL’s Infectious Disease Program

Laboratory Response Network (LRN)

Interviewer: Kate Wainwright, PhD, D(ABMM), HCLD (ABB), MPH, MSN, RN, deputy director, Public Health Protection and Laboratory Services, Indiana State Department of Health

Expert: Peter Shult, PhD, director, Communicable Disease Division; associate director, Wisconsin State Laboratory of Hygiene, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin-Madison

 

Lab Culture Ep. 11: What if there were no public health labs? | www.APHLblog.orgNewborn Screening:

APHL’s Newborn Screening Program

NewSTEPs

Baby’s First Test

Interviewer: Josh Rowland, MBA, MT(ASCP), manager, Training and Workforce Development, Association of Public Health Laboratories

Expert: Miriam Schachter, PhD, research scientist 3, New Jersey Department of Health, Newborn Screening Laboratory

 

Lab Culture Ep. 11: What if there were no public health labs? | www.APHLblog.orgFoodborne Illness:

APHL’s Food Safety Program

5 Things You Didn’t Know (but Need to Know) About Listeria

Interviewer: Samir Patel, PhD, FCCM, (D)ABMM, clinical microbiologist, Public Health Ontario; Toronto, Canada

Expert: Vanessa Allen, MD, MPH, medical microbiologist, chief of microbiology, Public Health Ontario; Toronto, Canada

 

Narrator:  Erin Bowles, B.S., MT(ASCP), Wisconsin Clinical Laboratory Network coordinator and co-biosafety officer, Communicable Disease Division, Wisconsin State Laboratory of Hygiene, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Contributor: Emily Travanty, PhD, scientific director, Laboratory Services Division, Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment

Special thanks to Jim Hermanson at the Wisconsin State Laboratory of Hygiene for his help in recording this episode.

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