Journals retract more than a dozen studies from China that may have used executed prisoners’ organs

In the past month, PLOS ONE and Transplantation have retracted fifteen studies by authors in China because of suspicions that the authors may have used organs from executed prisoners. All of the original studies — seven in Transplantation, and eight in PLOS ONE — were published between 2008 and 2014. Two involved kidney transplants, and … Continue reading Journals retract more than a dozen studies from China that may have used executed prisoners’ organs

With a badly handled tweet, PLOS angers scientists after a blog disappears

Tamsin Edwards was stunned. And hurt. On the afternoon of Friday, April 5, Edwards had just learned that her blog, “All Models Are Wrong,” had disappeared from the PLOS Blogs Network, where it was hosted. No warning. No communication from PLOS. So Edwards, a climate scientist at King’s College, London, tweeted: Dear @PLOS @PLOSBlogs my … Continue reading With a badly handled tweet, PLOS angers scientists after a blog disappears

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Glasgow professor leaves post amidst multiple retractions

A professor specializing in the health of children and pregnant women has left her post at the University of Glasgow, and issued three retractions in recent months. All three notices — issued by PLOS ONE — mention an investigation at the university, which found signs of data manipulation and falsification. Fiona Lyall, the last author … Continue reading Glasgow professor leaves post amidst multiple retractions

Have you seen more detail in PLOS ONE retraction notices? You’re welcome

If you’ve been pausing at some detailed PLOS ONE notices lately — such as one issued last month for a cancer paper that lists 21 shortcomings — you’re not alone. According to a spokesperson for the publisher, the journal has been progressively pushing towards more transparency in its notices — in part, because it was … Continue reading Have you seen more detail in PLOS ONE retraction notices? You’re welcome

Coming Down the Mountain: How Changes in the Water Cycle are Affecting Mountain Ecosystems

  As plants take in sunlight and carbon dioxide to grow, they also respire or “breath” out part of that carbon dioxide back to the atmosphere. When this occurs belowground from the plant’s roots, it’s

The Hidden Gems of Data Accessibility Statements

  Sometimes the best part of reading a scientific paper is an unexpected moment of recognition — not in the science, but in the humanity of the scientists. It’s reassuring in a way to find

Mark Twain and The Big Stump: Can We Save Nature From Ourselves?

  As you enter Kings Canyon and Sequoia National Park from highway 180 there is a small little parking lot to the side with a couple of bathrooms and a non-descript, standard-issue, brown, wooden park

National Parks are for the Birds

  Happy National Parks week! While I tend to plan trips around plants — Thuja plicata in Olympic National Park, Lathyrus japonicas at Cape Cod National Seashore — I understand the draw of non-botanical Park

One Small Step for Preprints, One Giant Step Forward for Open Scientific Communications

Thanks to our recent partnership with bioRxiv, PLOS authors will have the choice of posting their submitted manuscript on the bioRxiv preprint server on May 1st. Preprints enable authors to accelerate the dissemination of their

An Epic Joshua Tree Roadtrip & the Reproductive Ecology of an Iconic Southwest Plant

0000-0002-8715-2896 Think of your most amazing four-state roadtrip. How much data did you collect between stops at Disney Land and the hotel pool? Did you stargaze in the Mojave Desert or were you too exhausted