50 words for snow 4; species

All classificatory terms are impossible of exact definition. Their use always has and always will depend upon the consensus of opinion of those best qualified by wisdom, experience and natural good sense. They will never become stable; we shall never cease to amend, to change, to repudiate old and propose new, because we shall never Read More...

Second retraction for psychologist reveals clues about culprit behind misconduct

A social psychologist has retracted a second paper that contains “fabricated or manipulated data.” The first retraction for William Hart at the University of Alabama — also due to data manipulation — appeared earlier this year. The notice raised some questions over authorship: Hart was the sole author, but he blamed the retraction on a […]

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50 words for snow 3: what are phenomena?

If experienced observers are trained to observe natural phenomena in their environment, pace the “interference” of cultural accidents, what is it they observe? As I mentioned before, we are not born into a world of ready made phenomena. William James referred to the sensory world of a newborn baby as a “blooming, buzzing confusion”: Experience, from Read More...

50 words for snow 2: or, the economics of cultural categories

Humans evolved in a world where knowing whether an animal was an antelope or a lion was essential for their survival: they could eat the antelope, and they could be eaten by the lion. Accordingly, the human mind seems to have evolved to organize its knowledge of the natural world into sets of related categories Read More...

Six things we learned from that massive new study of intelligence genes

0000-0002-8715-2896 Six things we learned from that massive new study of intelligence genes   Posted May 26, 2017 by Tabitha M. Powledge in Uncategorized post-info AddThis Sharing Buttons above Genes help shape intelligence, period. That’s

Former Stanford researcher up to 5 retractions for unreliable data

A psychology researcher formerly based at Stanford University has logged her fifth retraction due to unreliable results. According to the notice in the Journal of Memory and Language, Sandra Lozano takes full responsibility for the retraction. Apparently, the retraction has been in the works for eight years — and in that time, journals have retracted […]

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The History of Life: Before Aristotle 3 – The Four Elements

The Four Elements (Empedocles) Empedocles (ca. 495–435 BCE), who lived in Sicily, was influenced both by the Pythagoreans and Parmenides (in his poem “On Nature”) and proposed what came to be called the “four elements” theory to explain why there was change if the universe was monistic. It was just recombination of eternal and unchanging elements (he called Read More...

Evopsychopathy series in PDF

I have converted my series on Evolutionary Psychology and Sociobiology to a handy PDF. Feel free to download it or even better, download it and pay something. Wilkins on Evopsychopathy [PDF] I will be converting other series also. Let me know in the comments what you’d like to see in this format.

Coop’s Scoop: Citizen science to study your dog, because your dog studies you

Thank you, Lassie for saving my life! And thank you Rover, Spot, Fido, Benji, and Snoopy. We can all shout this refrain, not just those pulled from a burning building or comforted by slobbery kisses. Dogs may have saved the … Continue reading »

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Walk the walk, talk the talk: Implications of dual-tasking on dementia research

By Ríona Mc Ardle You turn the street corner and bump into an old friend. After the initial greetings and exclamations of “It’s so good to see you!” and “Has it been that long?”, your friend inquires as to where … Continue reading »

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