Dealing with the reproducibility crisis: what can ECRs do about it?

  Unless you’ve been living under a rock (no judgment, by the way), I’m sure you’ve heard about the reproducibility crisis in scientific research. In 2016, two posts on this blog covered what the main

Reflections on International Day of Zero Tolerance for Female Genital Mutilation

By Jennifer Dias As social animals, humans often coordinate their lives around cultural norms, formally sanctioned rules that prescribe or proscribe certain behavior. Typically, when a large majority of people are dissatisfied with an existing

Highlights from the SBNS/NANSIG Neurosurgery Careers Day

One hundred and fifteen aspiring neurosurgeons flocked to the Royal College of Surgeons in London for the fifth annual Society of British Neurological Surgeons (SBNS) / Neurology and Neurosurgery Interest Group (NANSIG) Neurosurgery Careers Day,

Of Mice and Men: Uncovering Cardiovascular Disease Genetics

RCA_atherosclerosis-690x320February is American Heart Month, a great time to take a closer look at cardiovascular disease (CVD). According to the World Health Organization (WHO), about 17.5 million people die each year from CVD, a figure representing

Examining new trends in citizen science

At the start of every year, most people will have made a list of New Year’s resolutions. Some of the most common this year will be to get fit, adopt healthy eating habits and spend

Beyond the neuron: Emerging roles of glial cells in neuroscience

When we think of the brain, we often think of the amazing things it is capable of — from conjuring up wild dreams to mastering foreign languages. At the same time, we may also think

Broad-spectrum antimicrobials: Considering ‘Holobiont’ welfare

By Zohorul Islam The discovery of antibiotics (also referred to as antimicrobials) is perhaps the most revolutionary outcome in the medical sciences during the twentieth century, and has allowed medical practitioners to treat a wide range of bacterial infections; and … Continue reading »

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Archaeology and Conservation in the Tropical Forests of the Central African Republic

By Chris Kiahtipes The tropical forests and savannas of Africa play a central, symbolic role in our modern dialogue about wilderness, conservation, and land management. However, efforts to establish reserves, parks, and wilderness areas often create conflicts with local societies … Continue reading »

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A new role for an old Alzheimer’s-related protein

A new role for an old Alzheimer’s-related protein Loss of memory is a well-established symptom of Alzheimer’s disease. Also, cognitive impairment and personality changes are also observed in these patients [1]. Many studies investigating the causes of Alzheimer’s have focused … Continue reading »

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Is Facebook making you sad? Research evaluating social media use and impacts on mental well-being inconclusive

There are more than 500 million people interacting with Facebook from countries all over the world every single day, and that number is growing. On August 24, 2015 Facebook reached a milestone when, for the first time, one billion users … Continue reading »

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