Every tax cut and increase in House Republicans’ bill

The House Republicans will vote on a tax bill soon that adds about $1.4 trillion to the federal debt. Alicia Parlapiano and Adam Pearce, reporting for The New York Times, look at every change in this scroller.

I like that the visual is kept simple with a two-column, stacked bar chart as the backdrop. The chart provides scale, but the focus in on the text.

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Math to fix gerrymandering, explained in comic

Gerrymandering doesn’t sound like an especially sexy topic, but it’s an important one to pay attention to. District lines are drawn in roundabout ways sometimes to favor a party. This used to be a manual process, but math and computing has made it much easier to sway these days. Olivia Walch explains how math can be used to swing line drawing to a more equal process.

See also the gerrymandering game for another point of view.

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LaVar Ball trolling to the top, through a tweet count lens

I didn’t know who LaVar Ball was, and suddenly, it was non-stop sports news about the Ball family. If you’re unfamiliar, LaVar Ball is the father of a now professional basketball player. Before his son was drafted by the Los Angeles Lakers, Ball garnered attention for saying trollish things like he could’ve beat Michael Jordan one-on-one in his heyday.

Anthony Olivieri for ESPN outlines the rise of the loud talker using a simple tweet count and line chart as the backdrop.

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Mass exodus at human scale

Big numbers are too abstract in our minds to fully understand the scale of things. So, to show the full gravity of the hundreds of thousands of Muslims fleeing Myanmar’s Rakhine state, Reuters starts with the individuals and builds your intuition towards the true scale.

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Visual narrative of six asylum seekers

We often visualize migration and people movement as lines that go from point A to point B. While this can be interesting for overall trends, we lose something about the individuals leaving their home and traveling in hopes to find something some better. Federica Fragapane, in collaboration with Alex Piacentini, focuses in on six people leaving point A for point B to tell their stories.

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Most frequent how-tos we search for

Xaquín G.V., in collaboration with the Google News Lab, investigated what people around the world searched for how to do. Starting with items in the household that need fixing, the visual essay looks at more general topics and the seasonality of things. If anything, check out those animated GIFs.

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Measuring things with ships

We might be in an age of big data, but people have been trying to convey large numbers for a long time. John F. Ptak takes a quick look through the archives for the size of big things compared to ships. “These units of measurement do seem a little odd, but they really have a capacity to humanize inescapably difficult numbers by putting them in context with a known entity, like Trinity Church.”

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Data Comics

Comics are a way to tell stories and for a while now, people have been interested in telling stories with data. So it’s only natural that the two would come together at some point. Data Comics is a collection that highlights the emerging genre.

I’ve had Understanding Comics sitting on my desk for a couple of months now. Maybe it’s time to dig in.

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Color profiles of every Game of Thrones episode

As the final episode of Game of Thrones nears, Kavya Sukumar for Vox looked at the colors used in each episode. More relevant if you’ve seen the show, the wideout view makes it easy to pick out themes and events so that you can reminisce about all the characters who died.

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