Blockchain visually explained

I feel like I was supposed to know what blockchain is a while ago, but I’ve only had a hand-wavy explanation on hand. And it wasn’t a very good one. Reuters provides a clear and concise visual explanation of how blockchain works. Now I can explain it to friends and family whenever there’s a Bitcoin spike or dip, or I can at least point them to this explainer.

Tags: ,

Little League baseball analytics that would change the game forever

Oh. So that’s why I was always placed in right field that one year.

Tags: ,

History of the health meter in video games

The health meter in video games wasn’t always so commonplace. It took time, iterations, and various incarnations before it converged to what we know now. Ahoy describes the history:

Tags: ,

All the volcano eruptions

Slowly becoming the person who charts the past century of natural disaster events, Lazaro Gamio for Axios uses a pictogram to depict all known volcano eruptions since 1883. The vertical position represents elevation, color represents number of eruptions since 1883, and the shape represents volcano type.

I wonder if you get anything out of looking at eruptions over time. This view is more compendium than pattern revealer. You can grab the data from the Global Volcanism Program to check it out yourself.

Tags: ,

Vintage chart shows the evolution in design of everyday objects

By Raymond Loewy, this chart from 1934 shows the shifts in design of the car, telephone, and clock, among other things. I assume someone is already working on updating this one to the present. [via @michaelbierut]

Tags: , ,

Nigel Holmes new illustrated book on Crazy Competitions

Nigel Holmes, the graphic designer known for his playful illustrated graphics, has a new book: Crazy Competitions. It’s exactly what it sounds like.

Whether it’s flinging frozen rats or parading in holly evergreens, racing snails or carrying wives, human beings have long displayed their creativity in wild, odd, and sometimes just wonderful rituals and competitions. To show what lengths we’ll go to uphold our eccentric customs, British American graphic designer Nigel Holmes channels his belief in the power of hilarity to bring together a bewilderingly funny tour around the globe in search of incredible events, all dryly explained with brilliant infographics in Crazy Competitions.

Ordered.

Tags: , ,

What’s in a food truck

Food trucks are the real deal these days. The best ones serve a specialized menu really well, in a small, focused space. The Washington Post delves into the insides of several of these trucks and how they make the food with very specific equipment.

Tags: , ,

Subway delays visually explained

Adam Pearce for The New York Times describes the sad state of affairs that is the delayed subway trains in New York. One delay causes a ripple effect down the line, leaving little chance to get back on track. The more straightforward figures gear you up for the overall view at the end.

This was for New York specifically but is applicable to other transits and forms of transportation. See also the traffic gridlock simulation from a few years ago. It doesn’t take much for gridlock.

Tags: , ,

Get all caught up with The Avengers using this timeline

It’s been a decade since the first Iron Man movie, and some 30 superhero characters later, we arrive at a two-parter Avengers finale. But maybe you lost track of everything that happened leading up to this point. Sonia Rao and Shelly Tan for the Washington Post got you covered with a filterable timeline. Focus on specific stories, characters, and franchises. Select “block spoilers” in case you still plan to watch something.

I used to watch all of the Marvel movies, but then I had kids. I’ve seen one in five years. So this is right up my alley.

Tags: , ,

Waiting Game, through the steps of asylum seekers

Sisi Wei for ProPublica and Nick Fortugno of Playmatics made a game to provide a feeling of what it’s like for someone who needs escape from their home.

Based on the real case files of five asylum seekers from five countries and interviews with the medical and legal professionals who evaluate and represent them, The Waiting Game is an experimental news game that lets you walk in the shoes of an asylum seeker, from the moment they choose to come to the United States to the final decision in the cases before an immigration judge.

Take your time with this one, and use your headphones.

In the game format, I felt more engrossed in the individual stories than I think if it were a linear profile story.

Tags: , ,