SUIT UP for Lab Week — 2019 Lab Week ToolKit

SUIT UP for Lab Week -- 2019 Lab Week Toolkit | www.APHLblog.org

How do you suit up? With a crisp white lab coat and purple gloves? Or maybe in a fierce yellow hazmat suit? How about knee-high rubber boots and waders? However you SUIT UP, we want to see it! Take photos or video of you suiting up for Lab Week, and share on Instagram using #SuitUpforLabWeek.

Celebrate Lab Week April 21-27, 2019!

Join the conversation! Use and follow #LabWeek #SuitUpforLabWeek #APHL on:

Printables

Social media graphics

Sample social media posts

  • When evil pathogens appear, public health lab scientists don’t run the other way… they SUIT UP! http://www.aphlblog.org/ #LabWeek #SuitUpforLabWeek
  • Look at those ten little baby fingers and ten little baby toes! But does she have any serious heritable conditions? Newborn screening lab scientists SUIT UP to find out! http://bit.ly/2ERxbkQ #LabWeek #SuitUpforLabWeek
  • Millions of gallons of mine waste spilled into a river. Public health and environmental laboratory scientists immediately SUIT UP and go into response mode! http://bit.ly/2ERSWBc #LabWeek #SuitUpforLabWeek

Stories that highlight public health, environmental and agricultural laboratory work:

Videos

Celebration ideas

  • Celebrate Lab Week internally with a social event, banners or other decorations. Print posters, stickers and activity sheets shared below!
  • Hold an open house for media, elected officials, school groups, staff families and other members of the community. Check out the Milwaukee Health Department Laboratory’s story about their health fair for students.
  • Visit local elementary, middle and high schools to talk with students interested in science and health.
  • Write an op-ed piece for local newspapers and/or magazines to highlight the valuable contributions your public health laboratory staff are making in your community, city and/or state.
  • Do you have other ideas? Share them in our Facebook group, APHL Off the Bench, so others can enjoy them too!

Earth Day is April 22 – here are some ways to incorporate it into your Lab Week celebration:

  • Host a Green and Blue Day and ask staff to wear colors representing earth and water.
  • Hold a grounds-keeping afternoon: Invite staff and their families to help with weeding, mulch, planting, etc.
  • Ask if your regional EPA office plans to do something for Earth Day and join them as a partner.
  • Encourage employees to do Meatless Monday or purchase items at a local farmer’s market instead of the supermarket.
  • Encourage employees to carpool, take the bus, walk or ride their bike to work.
  • Learn more about the Water Environment Federation (WEF).

APHL is part of the Lab Week coalition.

 

 

The post SUIT UP for Lab Week — 2019 Lab Week ToolKit appeared first on APHL Lab Blog.

SUIT UP for Lab Week — 2019 Lab Week ToolKit

SUIT UP for Lab Week -- 2019 Lab Week Toolkit | www.APHLblog.org

How do you suit up? With a crisp white lab coat and purple gloves? Or maybe in a fierce yellow hazmat suit? How about knee-high rubber boots and waders? However you SUIT UP, we want to see it! Take photos or video of you suiting up for Lab Week, and share on Instagram using #SuitUpforLabWeek.

Celebrate Lab Week April 21-27, 2019!

Join the conversation! Use and follow #LabWeek #SuitUpforLabWeek #APHL on:

Printables

Social media graphics

Sample social media posts

  • When evil pathogens appear, public health lab scientists don’t run the other way… they SUIT UP! http://www.aphlblog.org/ #LabWeek #SuitUpforLabWeek
  • Look at those ten little baby fingers and ten little baby toes! But does she have any serious heritable conditions? Newborn screening lab scientists SUIT UP to find out! http://bit.ly/2ERxbkQ #LabWeek #SuitUpforLabWeek
  • Millions of gallons of mine waste spilled into a river. Public health and environmental laboratory scientists immediately SUIT UP and go into response mode! http://bit.ly/2ERSWBc #LabWeek #SuitUpforLabWeek

Stories that highlight public health, environmental and agricultural laboratory work:

Videos

Celebration ideas

  • Celebrate Lab Week internally with a social event, banners or other decorations. Print posters, stickers and activity sheets shared below!
  • Hold an open house for media, elected officials, school groups, staff families and other members of the community. Check out the Milwaukee Health Department Laboratory’s story about their health fair for students.
  • Visit local elementary, middle and high schools to talk with students interested in science and health.
  • Write an op-ed piece for local newspapers and/or magazines to highlight the valuable contributions your public health laboratory staff are making in your community, city and/or state.
  • Do you have other ideas? Share them in our Facebook group, APHL Off the Bench, so others can enjoy them too!

Earth Day is April 22 – here are some ways to incorporate it into your Lab Week celebration:

  • Host a Green and Blue Day and ask staff to wear colors representing earth and water.
  • Hold a grounds-keeping afternoon: Invite staff and their families to help with weeding, mulch, planting, etc.
  • Ask if your regional EPA office plans to do something for Earth Day and join them as a partner.
  • Encourage employees to do Meatless Monday or purchase items at a local farmer’s market instead of the supermarket.
  • Encourage employees to carpool, take the bus, walk or ride their bike to work.
  • Learn more about the Water Environment Federation (WEF).

APHL is part of the Lab Week coalition.

 

 

The post SUIT UP for Lab Week — 2019 Lab Week ToolKit appeared first on APHL Lab Blog.

Everything you need for Lab Week 2017

Everything you need for Lab Week 2017 | www.APHLblog.org

Lab Week is coming! April 23-29 we will join our members and partners to celebrate the vital contributions laboratory professionals make to protect public health and safety. APHL will be particularly focused on the laboratory professionals who make up our community – the dedicated individuals working at local, state, environmental and agricultural laboratories which comprise the public health laboratory system.

Follow APHL for our special Lab Week content!

While we celebrate you, our members, we also use Lab Week to increase awareness and demonstrate the importance of public health and environmental laboratories in our communities. We encourage you to do the same!

APHL is a proud partner of the March for Science | www.APHLblog.orgAPHL will be kicking off Lab Week by joining the March for Science! Check out our toolkit!

Below are some resources to help launch your own Lab Week celebration. These resources are for local, state, public health, environmental and agricultural laboratories alike! (If you are specifically interested in National Environmental Laboratory Professionals Week, scroll down for the toolkit.)

Social Media

Join the conversation using #LabWeek on any social network that uses hashtags (Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, etc.).

Sample social media posts (include a graphic or photo for added visibility):

Graphics

Videos

Here are two animated videos to share with your public audiences. Feel free to share the link or embed on your website.

What exactly do public health laboratories do? Share these stories that highlight their work:

Encourage others to consider laboratory careers! Share these stories:

Celebration ideas:

  • Celebrate Lab Week internally with a social event, banners or other decorations.
  • Hold an open house for media, elected officials, school groups, staff families and other members of the public. Check out the Milwaukee Health Department Laboratory’s story about their health fair for students.
  • Visit local elementary, middle and high schools to talk with students interested in STEM disciplines.
  • Write an op-ed piece for local newspapers and/or magazines to highlight the valuable contributions your public health laboratory staff are making in your community, city and/or state.
  • Are you the lab director or section manager? Think of fun and meaningful ways to thank your staff for their dedication to public health.

Other great resources:

 

The post Everything you need for Lab Week 2017 appeared first on APHL Lab Blog.

Discovering the Link Between Environmental Health and Public Health

April 20-26 is Laboratory Professionals Week! This year APHL is focusing on environmental health and the laboratorians who work to detect the presence of contaminants in both people and in the environment.  This post is part of a series.

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By Kathryn Wangsness, Chief, Office of Laboratory Services, Arizona State Public Health Laboratory

Ever since I was a little girl, I have always wanted to do something in the field of science that would help others.  Originally I thought of becoming a doctor or a nurse, but determined early on that was not for me.  I was then interested in perhaps teaching science at the high school level.  However, in high school I determined that I would much rather be doing testing that would assist others on a population scale.

Discovering the Link Between Environmental Health and Public Health | www.aphlblog.org

While working on my degree in Chemistry, I got a job with an insect ecologist and, later, a plant ecologist. I learned how we interact with our environment and how impacts on the environment affected the public.  It wasn’t until I graduated and was fortunate enough to land a job with the Arizona State Public Health Laboratory Chemistry section that I started seeing the connection to public health.

Early on in my career I started noticing that when there was an event that would have a potential environmental health impact, we would receive samples to provide needed information.  Performing the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) methods on a routine basis and in emergency situations taught me the importance of the work we do.  As I progressed through my career at the public health laboratory, I became an EPA Certification Officer for the state of Arizona and with the Arizona State Public Health Laboratory, which allowed me to expand my horizons and see how the environmental laboratory community was contributing to the safety and health of Arizonans.  I learned that the treatment of drinking water was one of the greatest revolutions in public health and that ensuring we continue to have a functioning system was critical to preventing reoccurrence of diseases like cholera.  During this time, I realized that I wanted to stay in public health and went on to earn a Master of Health Administration in 2007.

I also began to explore biomonitoring and the lab’s past, present and future involvement.  Biomonitoring allows us to explore the connections between the environment and the population to help promote and protect the public.  In my current role as Office Chief of Laboratory Services and Quality Assurance Manager, as well as in my previous role, I have the opportunity to provide training to our partners on the importance of testing and to provide presentations to educate the community on the work that we do.

I take pride in the work that I do to promote and educate individuals on what it means to be involved in public health laboratory work and that environmental health is a critical component of that work.  I enjoy coming to work at such a rewarding place every day.

 

Scientist? Actress? Or President?

April 20-26 is Laboratory Professionals Week! This year APHL is focusing on environmental health and the laboratorians who work to detect the presence of contaminants in both people and in the environment.  This post is part of a series.

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By Laurie Peterson-Wright, Chemistry Program Manager, Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment

Who would have known that the 1973 fifth grade class of Beadle Elementary in Yankton, South Dakota could predict the future?  As a classroom exercise, we all had to vote on what we would each be when we grew up.  I received 10 votes to become an actress, 10 votes to become a scientist and even one vote to be the first woman president!

Scientist? Actress? Or President? | www.aphlblog.org

My parents were adamant that I finish every project, class, book, craft or book I started.  This instilled within me a commitment to never quit and a sense of wonderment at where the next bit of knowledge and hard work would take me. My passion for any type of science began at a young age.  I would stay glued to my microscope or my telescope at night.  I wanted to learn everything about how humans and the universe operated.  I had so many educational ambitions – teaching, mathematician, certified public accountant, physicist, medical doctor, astronaut (and let us not forget Hollywood Star) – but after many years in school, I reeled my focus in to chemistry, mathematics and business administration.

My first position was in cancer research, but I was shortly introduced to environmental chemistry and project management.   I was intrigued by how chemical and radiological pollutants interacted with the environment and what we could do to mitigate exposure, especially for sensitive populations.  I spent 15 years in the environmental remediation/waste management field and then accepted a position with the State of Colorado Chemistry Program in 2001.  Immediately I embraced public health and how these same contaminants in the environment could be so easily transported.  I was fascinated by how they interacted with the human body including sensitive human and animal endocrine systems.

This world is an amazing place! By continuing to focus on my passion in public health, I will only increase my knowledge of how all sensitive systems are interconnected.  Live gently, and also boldly, my fellow scientists.

Oh, and by the way….I still act…and PS don’t tell my parents I never finished Moby Dick.