The Power of the Pediatrician’s Voice: Reflections on PAS 2018

The Power of the Pediatrician’s Voice: Reflections on PAS 2018   post-info Organizers and award recipients from the Pediatric Academic Societies (PAS) Meeting provide their impressions of this year’s meeting. The Pediatric Academic Societies (PAS) Meeting, held

What a Day! Day 3 of the APHL Annual Meeting

What a Day! Day 3 of the APHL Annual Meeting | www.APHLblog.org

Day 3 of the APHL Annual Meeting was a big one! We had several captivating sessions including this year’s Katherine Kelley Distinguished Lecturer, Maryn McKenna, renowned journalist and author. Listen to today’s episode to hear a few attendees share what they took away from the day.

You can listen to our show via the player embedded below or on iTunes, Stitcher or wherever you get your podcasts. Please be sure to subscribe to Lab Culture so you never miss an episode.

The post What a Day! Day 3 of the APHL Annual Meeting appeared first on APHL Lab Blog.

A Focused Intervention: The Provider’s Role in Firearm Violence Prevention

  A Focused Intervention: The Provider’s Role in Firearm Violence Prevention post-info Rocco Pallin and Garen Wintemute of the UC Davis Violence Prevention Research Program discuss the physician’s responsibility to discuss firearm safety with patients

Reporting from the Exhibit Hall: Day 2 of the APHL Annual Meeting

Reporting from the Exhibit Hall: Day 2 of the APHL Annual Meeting | www.APHLblog.org

A huge component of any APHL Annual Meeting is the exhibit hall. This year we were joined by 68 exhibitors, all of whom were sharing new and interesting products, services and technologies with meeting attendees. In today’s episode, we chat with representatives from Roche, Bio-Rad Laboratories and Hologic.

You can listen to our show via the player embedded below or on iTunes, Stitcher or wherever you get your podcasts. Please be sure to subscribe to Lab Culture so you never miss an episode.

Learn more about APHL’s corporate membership and other opportunities.

The post Reporting from the Exhibit Hall: Day 2 of the APHL Annual Meeting appeared first on APHL Lab Blog.

Reporting from the Exhibit Hall: Day 2 of the APHL Annual Meeting

Reporting from the Exhibit Hall: Day 2 of the APHL Annual Meeting | www.APHLblog.org

A huge component of any APHL Annual Meeting is the exhibit hall. This year we were joined by 68 exhibitors, all of whom were sharing new and interesting products, services and technologies with meeting attendees. In today’s episode, we chat with representatives from Roche, Bio-Rad Laboratories and Hologic.

You can listen to our show via the player embedded below or on iTunes, Stitcher or wherever you get your podcasts. Please be sure to subscribe to Lab Culture so you never miss an episode.

Learn more about APHL’s corporate membership and other opportunities.

The post Reporting from the Exhibit Hall: Day 2 of the APHL Annual Meeting appeared first on APHL Lab Blog.

Hello, Pasadena! Day 1 of the APHL Annual Meeting

Hello, Pasadena! Day 1 of the APHL Annual Meeting | www.APHLblog.org

We are in sunny Pasadena, California for the 2018 APHL Annual Meeting! Here is a little look at what we did on the first day. Stay tuned for updates every day through June 5.

You can listen to our show via the player embedded below or on iTunes, Stitcher or wherever you get your podcasts. Please be sure to subscribe to Lab Culture so you never miss an episode.

Join the conversation using #APHL on:

The post Hello, Pasadena! Day 1 of the APHL Annual Meeting appeared first on APHL Lab Blog.

New Lab Matters: When the water comes, be prepared

New Lab Matters: When the water comes, be prepared | www.APHLblog.org

According to a study by the National Center for Atmospheric Research, the volume of rainfall from storms will rise by as much as 80% in North America by the end of the century. Not only do storms and floods threaten public health laboratory facilities, but receding floodwaters pose serious public health risks. As our feature article shows, the best weapon in a public health laboratory’s arsenal is preparation for inundation…from any source.

Here are just a few of this issue’s highlights:

Subscribe and get Lab Matters delivered to your inbox, or read Lab Matters on your mobile device.

 

The post New Lab Matters: When the water comes, be prepared appeared first on APHL Lab Blog.

The Antimicrobial Resistance Channel – uniting the four pillars of AMR research

  The Antimicrobial Resistance Channel – uniting the four pillars of AMR research   post-info PLOS, in collaboration with the Global Antibiotic Research and Development Partnership (GARDP), is delighted to launch the Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR)

In Honor of the late Dr. Stanley Falkow

In Honor of the late Dr. Stanley Falkow   post-info Ralph Isberg, Editorial Advisor and former Section Editor for PLOS Pathogens, remembers his friend, colleague, and mentor Stanley Falkow, and reflects on his contributions to

4 Tips to Stay Healthy Around Your Pet

Father Reading Book With Son And Daughter And Pet Dog At Home

Pets, whether covered in fur, feathers, or scales, are an important part of our lives—most American households own at least one pet. Many people see their pet as a member of the family that brings joy and amusement to their life. But did you know that having a pet can even help improve your health? Having a pet can decrease your blood pressure, cholesterol, triglyceride levels, and feelings of loneliness. Pets can also encourage you to be active and get outside, and provide opportunities to socialize.

The risk of getting a disease from a pet is low for most people, but some groups are more likely to get sick from the germs spread by pets, and their illness may be more severe. Young children, older adults, people with weakened immune systems, and pregnant women are especially vulnerable to certain zoonotic infections.While there are many benefits to pet ownership, animals can sometimes carry germs that make us sick. Zoonotic diseases can spread between people and animals—even our pets. In the past decade, we’ve seen outbreaks of illness in people linked to pets such as puppies, rats, hamsters, guinea pigs, turtles, lizards, geckos, hedgehogs, and even water frogs.

You might not realize that the everyday activities involved in caring for your pet can result in the spread of germs from pets to people. Handling pet food and toys, cleaning cages, and yes, even kissing your pet, can pass germs from the pet to you. Pets can spread germs even if they look clean and healthy.

All of this may sound scary, but knowing about zoonotic diseases and the simple things you can do to reduce the risk will help you enjoy your pets and stay healthy. Adopt these four simple habits to help you, your family, and your pets stay healthy and happy.

  1. Choose the right pet
    Not all pets are right for all people. In addition to thinking about the pet’s needs, consider who will be around the pet at home. Are there young kids in the house, or maybe a relative over 65? Certain pets, including reptiles, amphibians, and rodents, are not recommended for children 5 years of age and younger, adults 65 years of age and older, and people with weakened immune systems because they’re more likely to get sick. Rodents and cats can carry diseases that cause birth defects, so think about waiting to adopt one of these pets if you or someone in your home is pregnant. Talk to your veterinarian about choosing the right pet.
  2. Keep your pet healthy
    Keeping your pet healthy helps to keep you healthy. Make sure pets get a good diet, fresh water, shelter, and exercise. Regular veterinary care is also important for your pet. Many pets need routine vaccinations, de-worming, and flea and tick control to protect them, and their owners, from certain diseases. Every pet—whether it’s a dog, cat, hamster, ferret, or iguana—should receive life-long veterinary care. If you think your pet might be sick, talk to your veterinarian. Also, remember to include your pets in your emergency preparedness plans so you can keep them safe and healthy in an emergency.
  3. Practice good hygiene
    Washing your hands is one of the best ways to stay healthy around pets and can also protect you against other diseases. Always wash your hands after playing with, feeding, or cleaning up after your pet. Pets can contaminate surfaces in your home with germs—you don’t have to touch your pets to get sick from the germs they might be carrying. Keep your pets away from people food and areas where food and drink are prepared, served, consumed, or stored. Always clean up dog feces (poop) from your yard and public areas to prevent the spread of parasites and other germs to people. If you’re pregnant and have a cat, avoid changing the litter box.
  4. Supervise kids around pets
    Always supervise young children around pets, even trusted family pets. Children, especially those 5 years of age and younger, can be at higher risk for pet-related illnesses because they often touch surfaces that may be contaminated, put objects in their mouths, and are less likely to wash their hands. Children are often the victims of bites and scratches and are more likely to get seriously ill from certain diseases spread from pets. Don’t let kids kiss pets or put their hands or objects in their mouths after playing with pets. Help them to wash their hands after they interact with any animal.

We all love our pets, but it’s important to know the risks that come with any animal contact, especially for people who are more vulnerable to certain diseases. Practicing healthy pet habits can help you enjoy your pets while staying healthy.

You can learn more about pets on CDC’s Healthy Pets Healthy People website, and be sure to check out this feature for more tips on staying healthy around pets.