CSI Tromsø: Where Forensics meets Vikings

  CSI Tromsø: Where Forensics meets Vikings   Posted August 22, 2018 by post-info Insect remains have their own tale to tell in the mystery that surrounds the Øsknes Viking burial boat, as Eva Pangiotakopulu

Dragonfly Watch – Find Those Fast and Furious Insects

Find out more about Dragonfly Monitoring and other great citizen science projects on SciStarter! “I’m an aquatic entomologist, and dragonflies and damselflies are the most colorful and noticeable insects in the habitats in which I work,” says Dr. Celeste A. … Continue reading »

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Art of Science: A Moth’s Brief Life in Art

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Artist Elsabé Dixon grew up raising silkworms in cardboard boxes as a child in South Africa.  Now based in Virginia, Dixon has made her childhood hobby the source of her art, now on display in a unique residency and installation called LIVE/LIFE at Arlington’s Artisphere through February 22.

In the Artisphere studio, Dixon and helpers first constructed an environment for domesticated silkworms (Bombyx mori) to live out a life cycle – hatching from eggs to caterpillars, eating mulberry leaves, spinning cocoons, pupating, mating and dying – and then created sculpture using what was left behind, including twigs, empty cocoons, salt and even silkworm poop.

Detail from LIVE/LIFE, Elsabe Dixon, Mixed Media, 2014-15

Detail from LIVE/LIFE, Elsabe Dixon, Mixed Media, 2014-15

Dixon sees the life cycle of the Bombyx mori – the only truly domesticated insect in the world – as a means of investigating many aspects of life. The first and most obvious is the ephemeral and ever-changing nature of life, but the work examines many other issues, including our relationships with society, nature and the built environment.

There are no barriers between the insects and the audience here. Visitors in the earlier months of the residency were free to touch the caterpillars and the moths. When I visited earlier in January, the moths were all dead, but I was able to touch the silk cocoons left behind.

The sculptural installation that Dixon has constructed, first for the silkworms to live in and then using their products and detritus, is based on microscopic photographs of silkworm particles. Made from materials including rubber, cut-up cardboard paper towel  tubes, discarded silk cocoons, mulberry branches and, yes, piles of caterpillar poop, the installation looks organic, natural, and utterly at home in its modern-art setting.

LIVE/LIFE is open to the public Thursday and Friday evenings as well as Sunday afternoons, when the artist welcomes visitors to join in conversations with her and others in the field of art, medicine, engineering and food production.


Filed under: The Art of Science Tagged: Bombyx, Bombyx mori, Elsabe Dixon, fiber art, Insect Art, insects, sciart, science art, silkworm, Silkworm Art

Science for the People: Edible

sftpThis week, they’re looking at the environmental impacts of foods we eat, and others that we should. They’ll speak to Daniella Martin, host of the insect cooking/travel show “Girl Meets Bug,” about her book “Edible: An Adventure into the World of Eating Insects and the Last Great Hope to Save the Planet.” And they’ll talk about the environmental effects of salmon farming with Peter Bridson, Aquaculture Research Manager for the Seafood Watch program at the Monterey Bay Aquarium (which has appeared in Eva Amsen’s Have Science Will Travel series).

*Josh provides research help to Science for the People and is, therefore, a completely biased and cooperative member of the team.


Filed under: Curiosities of Nature, Follies of the Human Condition Tagged: Daniella Martin, Edible, Girl Meets Bug, insects, Monterey Bay Aquarium, Peter Bridson, Podcast, science for the people

Catch the Katydid if You Can

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Katydid pic 1

It’s too fast to catch, spears smaller insects with spiny legs, and sings a song that mirrors the syllables of its name, “Ka-ty-did, Ka-ty-didn’t.­ Its music is so catchy, it has even been used as the …

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