Explore Explain is a new visualization podcast about how the charts get made

From Andy Kirk, there’s a new visualization podcast in town:

Explore Explain is a new data visualisation podcast and video series. Each episode is based on a conversation with visualisation designers to explore the design story behind a single visualisation, or series of related works. The conversations provide an opportunity to explain their design process and to share insight on the myriad little decisions that underpin the finished works. It also shines a light on the contextual circumstances that shaped their thinking.

Audiences will gain an appreciation of the what, the why and the how, learning about the hidden problems and challenges, the breakthroughs and the eureka moments, the pressures and frustrations, the things that were done and the things that were not done, as well as the successes and the failures.

My main podcast-listening mode was while driving, so I’m way behind, but this sounds promising. It’s right in line with Kirk’s Little of Visualization Design blog project.

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76 – Surveillance, Privacy and COVID-19

Carissa Veliz

How do we get back to normal after the COVID-19 pandemic? One suggestion is that we use increased amounts of surveillance and tracking to identify and isolate infected and at-risk persons. While this might be a valid public health strategy it does raise some tricky ethical questions. In this episode I talk to Carissa Véliz about these questions. Carissa is a Research Fellow at the Uehiro Centre for Practical Ethics at Oxford and the Wellcome Centre for Ethics and Humanities, also at Oxford. She is the editor of the Oxford Handbook of Digital Ethics as well as two forthcoming solo-authored books Privacy is Power (Transworld) and The Ethics of Privacy (Oxford University Press).

You can download the episode here or listen below.You can also subscribe to the podcast on Apple, Stitcher and a range of other podcasting services (the RSS feed is here). 


Show Notes

Topics discussed include
  • The value of privacy
  • Do we balance privacy against other rights/values?
  • The significance of consent in debates about consent
  • Digital contact tracing and digital quarantines
  • The ethics of digital contact tracing
  • Is the value of digital contact tracing being oversold?
  • The relationship between testing and contact tracing
  • COVID 19 as an important moment in the fight for privacy
  • The data economy in light of COVID 19
  • The ethics of immunity passports
  • The importance of focusing on the right things in responding to COVID 19
 

Relevant Links

 

75 – The Vital Ethical Contexts of Coronavirus


David Shaw

There is a lot of data and reporting out there about the COVID 19 pandemic. How should we make sense of that data? Do the media narratives misrepresent or mislead us as to the true risks associated with the disease? Have governments mishandled the response? Can they be morally blamed for what they have done. These are the questions I discuss with my guest on today's show: David Shaw. David is a Senior Researcher at the Institute for Biomedical Ethics at the University of Basel and an Assistant Professor at the Care and Public Health Research Institute, Maastricht University. We discuss some recent writing David has been doing on the Journal of Medical Ethics blog about the coronavirus crisis.

You can download the episode here or listen below. You can also subscribe to the podcast on Apple, Stitcher and a range of other podcasting services (the RSS feed is here).


 Show Notes

Topics discussed include...
  • Why is it important to keep death rates and other data in context?
  • Is media reporting of deaths misleading?
  • Why do the media discuss 'soaring' death rates and 'grim' statistics?
  • Are we ignoring the unintended health consequences of COVID 19?
  • Should we take the economic costs more seriously given the link between poverty/inequality and health outcomes?
  • Did the UK government mishandle the response to the crisis? Are they blameworthy for what they did?
  • Is it fair to criticise governments for their handling of the crisis?
  • Is it okay for governments to experiment on their populations in response to the crisis?

Relevant Links




74 – How to Understand COVID 19


Katherine Furman

I'm still thinking a lot about the COVID-19 pandemic. In this episode I turn away from some of the 'classical' ethical questions about the disease and talk more about how to understand it and form reasonable beliefs about the public health information that has been issued in response to it. To help me do this I will be talking to Katherine Furman. Katherine is a lecturer in philosophy at the University of Liverpool. Her research interests are at the intersection of Philosophy and Health Policy. She is interested in how laypeople understand issues of science, objectivity in the sciences and social sciences, and public trust in science. Her previous work has focused on the HIV/AIDs pandemic and the Ebola outbreak in West Africa in 2014-2015. We will be talking about the lessons we can draw from this work for how we think about the COVID-19 pandemic.

You can download the episode here or listen below. You can also subscribe to the podcast on Apple, Stitcher and a range of other podcasting services (the RSS feed is here).


Show Notes

Topics discussed include:
  • The history of explaining the causes of disease
  • Mono-causal theories of disease
  • Multi-causal theories of disease
  • Lessons learned from the HIV/AIDs pandemic
  • The practical importance of understanding the causes of disease in the current pandemic
  • Is there an ethics of belief?
  • Do we have epistemic duties in relation to COVID-19?
  • Is it reasonable to believe 'rumours' about the disease?
  • Lessons learned from the 2014-2015 Ebola outbreak
  • The importance of values in the public understanding of science

Relevant Links


 

73 – The Ethics of Healthcare Prioritisation during COVID 19

Lars_Sandman

We have a limited number of ventilators. Who should get access to them? In this episode I talk to Lars Sandman. Lars is a Professor of Healthcare Ethics at Linköping University, Sweden. Lars’s research involves studying ethical aspects of distributing scarce resources within health care and studying and developing methods for ethical analyses of health-care procedures. We discuss the ethics of healthcare prioritisation in the midst of the COVID 19 pandemic, focusing specifically on some principles Lars, along with others, developed for the Swedish government.

You download the episode here or listen below. You can also subscribe to the podcast on Apple, Stitcher and a range of other podcasting services (the RSS feed is here).


Show Notes

  • The prioritisation challenges we currently face
  • Ethical principles for prioritisation in healthcare
  • Problems with applying ethical theories in practice
  • Swedish legal principles on healthcare prioritisation
  • Principles for access to ICU during the COVID 19 pandemic
  • Do we prioritise younger people?
  • Chronological age versus biological age
  • Could we use a lottery principle?
  • Should we prioritise healthcare workers?
  • Impact of COVID 19 prioritisation on other healthcare priorities
 

Relevant Links



72 – Grief in the Time of a Pandemic

MCholbi-Head-Tight-269x300

Lots of people are dying right now. But people die all the time. How should we respond to all this death? In this episode I talk to Michael Cholbi about the philosophy of grief. Michael Cholbi is Professor of Philosophy at the University of Edinburgh. He has published widely in ethical theory, practical ethics, and the philosophy of death and dying. We discus the nature of grief, the ethics of grief and how grief might change in the midst of a pandemic.

You can download the episode here or listen below. You can also subscribe to the podcast on Apple, Stitcher and a range of other podcasting services (the RSS feed is here).


Show Notes

Topics discussed include...
  • What is grief?
  • What are the different forms of grief?
  • Is grief always about death?
  • Is grief a good thing?
  • Is grief a bad thing?
  • Does the cause of death make a difference to grief?
  • How does the COVID 19 pandemic disrupt grief?
  • What are the politics of grief?
  • Will future societies memorialise the deaths of people in the pandemic?
 

Relevant Links



71 – COVID 19 and the Ethics of Infectious Disease Control

Mercado_de_mariscos_de_Wuhan_cerrado_tras_detectarse_ahi_por_primera_vez_el_Nuevo_Coronavirus_

As nearly half the world's population is now under some form of quarantine or lockdown, it seems like an apt time to consider the ethics of infectious disease control measures of this sort. In this episode, I chat to Jonathan Pugh and Tom Douglas, both of whom are Senior Research Fellows at the Uehiro Centre for Practical Ethics in Oxford, about this very issue. We talk about the moral principles that should apply to our evaluation of infectious disease control and some of the typical objections to it. Throughout we focus specifically on some of different interventions that are being applied to tackle COVID-19.

You can download the episode here or listen below. You can also subscribe to the podcast on Apple, Stitcher and a range of other podcasting services (the RSS feed is here).



Show Notes

Topics covered include:
  • Methods of infectious disease control
  • Consequentialist justifications for disease control
  • Non-consequentialist justifications
  • The proportionality of disease control measures
  • Could these measures stigmatise certain populations?
  • Could they exacerbate inequality or fuel discrimination?
  • Must we err on the side of precaution in the midst of a novel pandemic?
  • Is ethical evaluation a luxury at a time like this?

Relevant Links


   

70 – Ethics in the time of Corona


Coronavirus_3-696x477

Like almost everyone else, I have been obsessing over the novel coronavirus pandemic for the past few months. Given the dramatic escalation in the pandemic in the past week, and the tricky ethical questions it raises for everyone, I thought it was about time to do an episode about it. So I reached out to people on Twitter and Jeff Sebo kindly volunteered himself to join me for a conversation. Jeff is a Clinical Assistant Professor of Environmental Studies, Affiliated Professor of Bioethics, Medical Ethics, and Philosophy, and Director of the Animal Studies M.A. Program at New York University. Jeff’s research focuses on bioethics, animal ethics, and environmental ethics. This episode was put together in a hurry but I think it covers a lot of important ground. I hope you find it informative and useful. Be safe!

You can download the episode here or listen below. You can also subscribe to the podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher and many over podcasting services (the RSS feed is here).


Show Notes

Topics covered include:
  • Individual duties and responsibilities to stop the spread
  • Medical ethics and medical triage
  • Balancing short-term versus long-term interests
  • Health versus well-being and other goods
  • State responsibilities and the social safety net
  • The duties of politicians and public officials
  • The risk of authoritarianism and the erosion of democratic values
  • Global justice and racism/xenophobia
  • Our duties to frontline workers and vulnerable members of society
  • Animal ethics and the risks of industrial agriculture
  • The ethical upside of the pandemic: will this lead to more solidarity and sustainability?
  • Pandemics and global catastrophic risks
  • What should we be doing right now?
 

Some Relevant Links




69 – Wood on Sustainable Superabundance

David Wood
In this episode I talk to David Wood. David is currently the chair of the London Futurists group and a full-time futurist speaker, analyst, commentator, and writer. He studied the philosophy of science at Cambridge University. He has a background in designing, architecting, implementing, supporting, and avidly using smart mobile devices. He is the author or lead editor of nine books including, "RAFT 2035", "The Abolition of Aging", "Transcending Politics", and "Sustainable Superabundance". We chat about the last book on this list -- Sustainable Superabundance -- and its case for an optimistic future.

You can download the episode here or listen below. You can also subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, Spotify and other podcasting services (the RSS feed is here).

Show Notes

  • 0:00 - Introduction
  • 1:40 - Who are the London Futurists? What do they do?
  • 3:34 - Why did David write Sustainable Superabundance?
  • 7:22 - What is sustainable superabundance?
  • 11:05 - Seven spheres of flourishing and seven types of superabundance?
  • 16:16 - Why is David a transhumanist?
  • 20:20 - Dealing with two criticisms of transhumanism: (i) isn't it naive and polyannish? (ii) isn't it elitist, inegalitarian and dangerous?
  • 30:00 - Key principles of transhumanism
  • 34:52 - How will we address energy needs of the future?
  • 40:35 - How optimistic can we really be about the future of energy?
  • 46:20 - Dealing with pessimism about food production?
  • 52:48 - Are we heading for another AI winter?
  • 1:01:08 - The politics of superabundance - what needs to change?

 

Relevant Links




67 – Rini on Deepfakes and the Epistemic Backstop

reginarini

In this episode I talk to Dr Regina Rini. Dr Rini currently teaches in the Philosophy Department at York University, Toronto where she holds the Canada Research Chair in Philosophy of Moral and Social Cognition. She has a PhD from NYU and before coming to York in 2017 was an Assistant Professor / Faculty Fellow at the NYU Center for Bioethics, a postdoctoral research fellow in philosophy at Oxford University and a junior research fellow of Jesus College Oxford. We talk about the political and epistemological consequences of deepfakes. This is a fascinating and timely conversation.

You can download this episode here or listen below. You can also subscribe to the podcast on Apple Podcasts, Stitcher and a variety of other podcasting services (the RSS feed here).


Show Notes

  • 0:00 - Introduction
  • 3:20 - What are deepfakes?
  • 7:35 - What is the academic justification for creating deepfakes (if any)?
  • 11:35 - The different uses of deepfakes: Porn versus Politics
  • 16:00 - The epistemic backstop and the role of audiovisual recordings
  • 22:50 - Two ways that recordings regulate our testimonial practices
  • 26:00 - But recordings aren't a window onto the truth, are they?
  • 34:34 - Is the Golden Age of recordings over?
  • 39:36 - Will the rise of deepfakes lead to the rise of epistemic elites?
  • 44:32 - How will deepfakes fuel political partisanship?
  • 50:28 - Deepfakes and the end of public reason
  • 54:15 - Is there something particularly disruptive about deepfakes?
  • 58:25 - What can be done to address the problem?
 

Relevant Links