Change in internet usage since the virus

Your schedule changed. The time spent in front of or using a screen probably shifted. Using data from SimilarWeb and Apptopia, Ella Koeze and Nathaniel Popper for The New York Times look at how these changes are reflected in average daily traffic for major websites and apps.

More video games, more social apps, and more virus news.

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Internet under the sea

To connect servers around the world, there are actual cables that run under the ocean. The New York Times mapped current and future cables, with a focus on the ones owned by Amazon, Facebook, Google, and Microsoft. “Content providers like Microsoft, Google, Facebook and Amazon now own or lease more than half of the undersea bandwidth.” Sure. Totally fine.

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Fake internet

Max Read for New York Magazine describes the fake-ness of internet through the metrics, the people, and the content:

Can we still trust the metrics? After the Inversion, what’s the point? Even when we put our faith in their accuracy, there’s something not quite real about them: My favorite statistic this year was Facebook’s claim that 75 million people watched at least a minute of Facebook Watch videos every day — though, as Facebook admitted, the 60 seconds in that one minute didn’t need to be watched consecutively. Real videos, real people, fake minutes.

I wonder how the fake-ness level online compares to fraud IRL.

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Tech generations, as seen through video source, music players, and internet access

In a fun piece by Reuben Fischer-Baum, reporting for The Washington Post:

In the past three decades, the United States has seen staggering technological changes. In 1984, just 8 percent of households had a personal computer, the World Wide Web was still five years away, and cell phones were enormous. Americans born that year are only 33 years old.

Here’s how some key parts of our technological lives have shifted, split loosely into early, middle and current stages.

There will always be a place in my heart that longs for the good ol’ days of my Walkman, modem sounds, and the phone-less outdoors. Tear.

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Changing internet markets for sex work

The internet changed how sex workers and clients find each other and how the former does business. Allison Schrager, Christopher Groskopf, and Scott Cunningham, reporting for Quartz, delve into actual numbers using scraped data from The Erotic Review:

Sex work is as old as civilization, but in the past 20 years the market for illegal sex services has undergone a radical transformation thanks to the internet, upending how it is sold and priced. There are now more women selling sex, more overall encounters, and—unlike in many other industries disrupted by the web—higher wages for workers.

Also safer (although still with its inherent risks).

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Microsoft Tools for Academics: An interview with Alex Wade

Microsoft Tools for Academics: An interview with Alex Wade   Posted February 16, 2016 by Jen Laloup in Podcast post-info AddThis Sharing Buttons above Academics increasingly use web scale Internet searches to discover new research.  In

Live cyber attack map

Internet attack map

Norse monitors cyber attacks in real-time. This is their map of what's going on. (All I hear is pew, pew, pew when I watch it.) [via Boing Boing]

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And the Title II goes to…

According to multiple reports and his own opinion piece in Wired, FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler is ready to propose rules to protect Net Neutrality by extending Title II utility status to broadband. Wheeler wrote in Wired:

Originally, I believed that the FCC could assure internet openness through a determination of “commercial reasonableness” under Section 706 of the Telecommunications Act of 1996. While a recent court decision seemed to draw a roadmap for using this approach, I became concerned that this relatively new concept might, down the road, be interpreted to mean what is reasonable for commercial interests, not consumers.

That is why I am proposing that the FCC use its Title II authority to implement and enforce open internet protections.

This appears to be a victory for the grassroots activism that has been fighting the large telecom lobbyists. The full details of his proposal are not yet available. So, we shall have to wait and hope that today’s optimism is well founded in the fine print of a 300+ page document.


Filed under: Follies of the Human Condition Tagged: FCC, Federal Communications Commission, Internet, Linkonomicon, Net Neutrality, Title II, Tom Wheeler, Wired

Free Online Marketing Advice

It is the Internet. Everyone arrives bored and annoyed.


Filed under: Follies of the Human Condition Tagged: Internet, marketing

Saving Net Neutrality

The FCC has extended its deadline for public commentary on proposed new rules regarding Net Neutrality, because their website crashed. Why did it crash? Because it was not prepared to handle the outpouring of support in favor of an open internet and opposition to a system where the few remaining ISPs are able to control what you see and how quickly you can see it.

We’ve got a few more days to make our voices heard. Please join me in voicing your support for Net Neutrality.

Here is one of my comments, dashed off and submitted through the Electronic Frontier Foundation’s web tool (feel free to reuse the last paragraph if you wish). There are other avenues to submitting a comment too. Be aware that your comment will be included in the public record and will be viewable online. So, limit your cursing. If you don’t feel like writing, there is a petition based submission platform from Fight for the Future.

Dear FCC,
I’m Joshua Witten and I live in Hartsville, SC.

Net neutrality, the principle that Internet service providers (ISPs) treat all data that travels over their networks equally, is important to me because without it users may have fewer options and a less diverse Internet.

A pay-­to-play Internet worries me because new, innovative services that can’t afford expensive fees for better service will be less likely to succeed.

The Internet provides a unique way to broadly connect our society in a way that fosters communication and creativity. A failure to guarantee Net Neutrality sacrifices the benefits to creativity and economics of an open Internet to protect a select few from the natural process of having to adapt to a changing business environment. A loss of Net Neutrality will disadvantage the most innovative segments of our society. It is the responsibility of the FCC to define and protect a communication environment that benefits the country, not a select few interests.

Sincerely,
Joshua Witten


Filed under: Items of Interest Tagged: EFF, FCC, FFTF, Internet, ISP, Net Neutrality