Farewell, Providence! APHL Annual Meeting — Days 3 and 4

Farewell, Providence! APHL Annual Meeting — Days 3 and 4 | www.APHLblog.org

After four days of fascinating speakers, networking with peers and partners from around the world, and enjoying public health jokes that only insiders would understand, the 2017 APHL Annual Meeting came to a close. It was the largest meeting yet with over 700 attendees. We are so thankful to the APHL staff, members, partners, exhibitors and speakers who made this meeting a success! See you all in Pasadena, California in 2018!

Below is a round-up of days 3 and 4.

Day 1 round-up

Day 2 round-up

The post Farewell, Providence! APHL Annual Meeting — Days 3 and 4 appeared first on APHL Lab Blog.

Questions about GTR, ClinVar, or MedGen? Ask us at ASCO 2017!

NCBI will be exhibiting at the ASCO Annual Meeting 2017 from June 2-6. Exhibit Hall Booth #3046 ASCO attendees can get navigation tips and hands-on help with GTR and ClinVar submissions, take handout materials and meet with Adriana Malheiro, MS* … Continue reading

Conferences on Weekends? Good or Bad Idea? Summary of responses to query ..

Lots of fascinating and very useful response to a question I asked yesterday about conferences on weekends.  When I wrote the post I had a personal point of view - that conferences on weekends were bad.  But I knew I had heard many others argue that it was better for some people to have them on weekends and I thought it might be good to hear what people thought.

So I made a Storify of the responses so far.



I also got some good responses on Facebook.

Some of the themes so far are discussed below:

Many factors come into play including
  • Job type
  • Financial status
  • Having children and the children's ages
  • Having partners 
  • Partner's work commitments
  • Distance from meeting
  • Duration of meeting
  • Quality of the conference
Weekends can be BAD for some people if
  • They try to save weekends for family or general life (as in, not work) activities
  • They have children and children are young, seems like many find it harder or less desirable to go away on weekends
  • They get assistance with childcare during the week (e.g., daycare) but not on weekend so then partners have harder time alone on weekend
  • They are in a long-distance relationship weekends may be only chance to see partner
Weekends can be GOOD for some people if
  • They just cannot get away at all during the week 
    • maybe due to clinical commitments 
    • maybe due to heavy teaching loads
  • When they leave their partner(s) take care of family commitments and if partners work during the week, they may be better able to deal with weekends without a partner
  • Even if partners do not work, taking care of family alone during week may be harder than on weekends
Suggestions for how to deal with the challenges of conferences
  • Move the location around so that people are affected differently each time (e.g., travel time can add to the challenges for meetings so if you move the meeting travel time will not always affect people from the same places in the same way)
  • Move the weekend/weekday aspect of the meeting 
  • Make meetings as family friendly as possible (this seems to be true if on weekend or not)
  • Make meetings short
  • Conference participation needs to be optional 
  • Have meeting stat bridge weekdays and weekends and allow registration just for one part
  • Live stream conferences so people can participate remotely
  • Record and post videos 
  • Live Tweet and use other social media to allow people to participate remotely
More comments and thoughts would be welcome and thanks so much to the comments so far.

UPDATE 1:
I will repost the request during the week so that I sample thoughts from people who are not answering questions on weekends.  Doh. Thanks to Fiona Brinkman for pointing this sampling bias out to me.




Have questions about newborn screening and genetics? Now is your chance to ask!

Have questions about newborn screening and genetics? Now is your chance to ask! | www.APHLblog.org

Next Monday, APHL will kick off the 2016 Newborn Screening and Genetic Testing Symposium in St. Louis, Missouri! Held every 18 months, this conference brings together newborn screening lab scientists, pediatricians, genetic counselors, follow-up coordinators and other professionals working on population genetics. Together, they will address state, national and international newborn screening and genetic testing issues that are important to public health.

Whether you are attending the symposium or not, you can follow the conversation on Twitter using #NBSGTS.

We are extremely excited to have NPR science correspondent, Joe Palca, join our keynote panel! Dr. Palca will present as one of the panelists during this session entitled, “Expanding the Newborn Screening Gateway: Considerations, Applications and Future Implications for Genomics and Precision Medicine.” He will also moderate the Q&A portion of this session.

This year we want to invite you to submit questions to be answered by Dr. Palca and our other highly regarded panelists.

Below is a list of the panelists and their presentation topics, as well as information on how to submit your questions. It is going to be a great discussion!

If you have a question about newborn screening and whole genome sequencing, genetics or genomics, please send them to us by Friday, February 26 at 5:00pm ET. Here’s how:

We might not be able to respond to every question, but we will try our best! If we can’t answer your question during the session, we will work to have an APHL newborn screening team member provide an answer after the symposium.

The keynote session is on Monday, February 29 from 1:30-3:30 PM CT (2:30-4:30 ET)! Be sure to follow #NBSGTS for live tweets from conference attendees!

Have questions about newborn screening and genetics? Now is your chance to ask! | www.APHLblog.org

#YAMMM Alert: NGS Data Analysis & Informatics (Yet Another Mostly Male Meeting)




Just got this email:

Dear Jonathan, 

I hope this email finds you well. I came across your profile while doing some research on the NGS Data Analysis field and I would like to invite you and your team to the “NGS Data Analysis and Informatics Conference, 2016” which will be held on the 18th and 19th of February in San Diego, USA which I hope would be of your interest. I am glad to inform one of the conference sponsors (Illumina, Seven Bridges Genomics, and Molecular Health) has helped arrange a complimentary VIP pass for you. We have limited passes which are being offered for you and some other experts in US. 

We are holding these sponsored pass until the end of this week or till these passes are taken, whichever is the earliest. Request you to kindly confirm your participation at the earliest by replying to this email. Attached is the VIP pass.
Our conference link- http://www.mnmconferences.com/ngs-data-analysis-informatics-congress-usa.html 

I would be grateful if you can share the information with your colleagues if you are not the right person to contact. Let me know if you need any further information. 

Kind Regards, Mahvish Anwar Delegate Executive- Markets and Markets Conferences

So, I checked out the meeting and the gender ratio of speakers.  Not good:
4 and 16 were counted at NGS Data Analysis #NGS. Learn more at GenderAvenger Tally




No thanks, not interested in attending, even for free, a YAMMM (Yet Another Mostly Male Meeting).

More research highlights from the 2015 AGU Fall Meeting

agu_paleonThe 2015 AGU Fall Meeting was filled with many highlights, from R2-D2 to Elon Musk. PLOS Ecology’s own Jens Heggs wrote about these and other highlights earlier this week. This was my fourth trip to

How to be a conference pro!

CRZcJlrUsAE8522Academic conferences are the annual meeting places for scientific communities to network, present their latest research, and celebrate the year’s achievements. Conferences like these are a bit different from, say, a science fiction convention or

Yet another mostly male meeting (YAMMM) from Cold Spring Harbor

I guess this would go down in "You Can't Make This Stuff Up" or something like that. A few weeks ago, I posted an anonymous guest post about the lack of female speakers at the Programming for Biology workshop at Cold Spring Harbor Labs: Guest post on Yet Another Mostly Male Meeting (YAMMM) - Programming for Biology.  This got a response from Cold Spring Harbor on Twitter claiming they do work to have diverse speakers at their meetings.

Then I got an email last week inviting me to Cold Spring Harbor meeting on the History of DNA Sequencing with a truly awful gender ratio.  So I wrote a blog post about that: Cold Spring Harbor presents the men's only view on the evolution of sequencing.  And also started a discussion about this on Twitter.

And in response to some comments from some of the CSHL Meeting people I decided to look into the past meetings in the same history of science series and was saddened with the incredibly low # of female speakers at all the meetings in this series. So I posted about that ...

And had more discussions on Twitter where CSHL made some claims about these History of Science meetings being a special case (not buying their argument, just reporting what they said).

And I thought I could have a relaxing Fourth of July weekend not spending my time dealing with Cold Spring Harbor Meetings.  And then, well, I got an email from CSHL that I just looked at a few minutes ago.  This email invited me to one of their "CSHL Asia Conferences".


I clicked on the link and when to the meeting site: Biological Rhythms and sadly I got sucked into YAMMM (yet another mostly male meeting) land.  Here are the details on the organizers and presenters as far as I could sort out.  I have labelled people I infer to be likely male in yellow and likely female in green.  (I note I accept that a binary male vs. female representation of gender is less than ideal but I think in general this is a useful thing to look and to make some hypotheses for to assess meetings).

Organizers:
  1. Carla Green, UT Southwestern, USA
  2. Michael Hastings, MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, UK
  3. Joseph Takahashi, HHMI/UT Southwestern, USA
  4. Hiroki Ueda, University of Tokyo/RIKEN, Japan
  5. Han Wang, Soochow University, China
Speakers
  1. Joseph Takahashi, HHMI/UT Southwestern Medical Center, USA 
  2. Ravi Allada, Northwestern University, USA 
  3. Joseph Bass, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, USA 
  4. Deborah Bell-Pedersen, Texas A&M University, USA 
  5. Nicolas Cermakian, Douglas Mental Health University Institute, CANADA 
  6. Xinnian Dong, Duke University, USA 
  7. Yoshitaka Fukada, University of Tokyo, JAPAN 
  8. Carla Green, The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, USA 
  9. Jinhu Guo, Sun Yat-Sen University, China 
  10. Fang Han, Peking University People’s Hospital of Beijing, CHINA 
  11. Qun He, China Agricultural University, China 
  12. John Hogenesch, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, USA 
  13. Zhili Huang, Fudan University, China 
  14. Takao Kondo, Nagoya University/Div. of Biological Science, JAPAN 
  15. Katja Lamia, The Scripps Research Institute, USA 
  16. Cheng Chi Lee, University of Texas Health Science Center Houston, USA 
  17. Yi Liu, UT Southwestern Medical Center, USA 
  18. Chang Liu, Nanjing Normal University, China 
  19. Hugh Piggins, University of Manchester, UNITED KINGDOM 
  20. Till Roenneberg, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich, GERMANY 
  21. Louis Ptacek, HHMI/University of California San Francisco, USA 
  22. Hiroki Ueda, RIKEN Kobe Institute, JAPAN 
  23. David Virshup, Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School, SINGAPORE 
  24. Han Wang, Soochow University, China 
  25. Charles Weitz, Harvard Medical School, USA 
  26. David Whitmore, University College London, UNITED KINGDOM 
  27. Ying Xu, Soochow University, China 
  28. Xiaodong Xu, Hubei Normal University, China 
  29. Erquan Zhang, National Institute of Biological Sciences, China 
  30. Zhangwu Zhao, China Agricultural University, China

So that is 30 speakers.  Only 29 of which could I find information on the web to make a hypothesis of gender.  Of those 29, I inferred 6 - or 20% to be female.  That is just really low for biological sciences.  I am sorry Cold Spring Harbor but you are just not doing a good enough job with diversity.  Scratch that, you are doing a bad job.  Sad to see.  

Kudos to California Academy of Sciences for Responding (Well) to Gender Bias Issue at Meeting They Are Hosting

Just a quick post of a Storify relating to a meeting at the Calacademy:

Highlights from the 2015 Meeting of the Vision Sciences Society

Going to conferences is one of my favorite aspects about being a scientist. As a PhD student, I spend a lot of my life in solitude: when I read new literature, when I program new experiments, or when I conduct … Continue reading »

The post Highlights from the 2015 Meeting of the Vision Sciences Society appeared first on PLOS Blogs Network.