Defining visualization literacy

Michael Correll on the use of “visualization literacy” in research:

If people (and, by some definitions, many or even most people) are chart illiterates, then we may feel tempted to write those groups off. We may prioritize the design of visualizations to help the creators of, say, machine learning models, from whom we can presume a sufficient level of visual and statistical literacy, rather than the populations who may be impacted by these models (sometimes unjustly). If what we mean by “visualization literacy” is narrow enough, or rare enough, then we’re already setting ourselves mental upper bounds for the number of people we’ll impact with our work.

This was an interesting perspective. I’m used to listening to or reading from people on the presentation side of visualization, in which case it’s your job to raise literacy. You should imagine what others are thinking and explain any points of possible confusion with annotation and intuitive visual encodings.

Don’t ever use “people won’t understand it” as a crutch.

Tags: ,

Visualization research for non-researchers

Reading visualization research papers can often feel like a slog. As a necessity, there’s usually a lot of jargon, references to William Cleveland and Robert McGill, and sometimes perception studies that lack a bit of rigor. So for practitioners or people generally interested in data communication, worthwhile research falls into a “read later” folder never to be seen again.

Multiple Views, started by visualization researchers Jessica Hullman, Danielle Szafir, Robert Kosara, and Enrico Bertini, aims to explain the findings and the studies to a more general audience. (The UW Interactive Data Lab’s feed comes to mind.) Maybe the “read later” becomes read.

I’m looking forward to learning more. These projects have a tendency to start with a lot of energy and then fizzle out, so I’m hoping we can nudge this a bit to urge them on. Follow along here.

Tags: ,

Gordon Research Conference on Craniofacial Morphogenesis and Tissue Regeneration (February 11 – 16, 2018): Licia Selleri & Ophir Klein

  Gordon Research Conference on Craniofacial Morphogenesis and Tissue Regeneration (February 11 – 16, 2018): Licia Selleri & Ophir Klein   Posted August 22, 2018 by post-info As part of its mission to encourage engagement

The XV Collection: Perverse Outcomes of Novel Therapies

  The XV Collection: Perverse Outcomes of Novel Therapies Posted August 10, 2018 by post-info by Andrew Read Yale professor Steve Stearns once warned that the transition from Young Turk to Old Turkey happens quickly.

PLOS Biology in the media – July

  PLOS Biology in the media – July   post-info The year is flying past, and July has been another month with several of our papers making the news. This month we’re covering sleeping flies,

How Can Africa Prevent the Next Haemorrhagic Fever Crisis? Invest in Research and Development

  By Dr. Jenniffer Mabuka In 2014, West Africa encountered its worst recorded outbreak of Ebola with over 11,000 reported deaths. The memory of this crisis hadn’t faded yet when Ebola reared its ugly head

The XV Collection: Anatomy of a Protein Kinase Spine and How to Break It

  The XV Collection: Anatomy of a Protein Kinase Spine and How to Break It   post-info by Ann Stock The post-translational addition of phosphate groups to serine, threonine and tyrosine residues is a fundamental

Tips on Nominating an Article for the $5,000 PLOS Genetics Research Prize 2018

  post-To help you nominate your chosen article, we’ve provided some helpful tips in this post. We look forward to your involvement – review the program information and submit your nomination(s)! Last month, PLOS Genetics

PLOS Biology in the media – May

PLOS Biology in the media – May   post-info This year is flying by, and May was another bumper month at PLOS Biology. In May we’ve covered all things hair, mind-controlled avatar races, and plant

Winners of the 2018 PLOS Computational Biology Research Prize

  Winners of the 2018 PLOS Computational Biology Research Prize   post-info It’s time to celebrate the best of PLOS Computational Biology!  In 2017 PLOS Computational Biology launched the “PLOS Computational Biology Research Prize” program