Stack Overflow salary calculator for developers

Stack Overflow used data from their developer survey to build a prediction model for salary, based on role, location, education, experience, and skills. The result was a salary calculator that you can use to gauge how much you should be making.

In this salary calculator, we report a predicted salary for the location, education, experience, and other information you enter. We also report a 50% prediction interval. The specific statistical meaning of this interval is that we expect 50% of people with the same characteristics as you to have salaries within that range; it spans the 25th to 75th percentiles. The interval is just as important as the prediction itself (the 50th percentile), because it gives you an understanding of what the range of expected salaries could be.

Nifty.

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Looking for improbably frequent lottery winners

After hearing the story of reporter Lawrence Mower, who discovered fraudsters after a FOIA request in Florida, a group for the Columbia Journalism Review and PennLive looked to expand on the analysis.

Intrigued, we wanted to chart new territory: to find out whether these repeat winning patterns exist across the country. We decided to submit public records requests in every state with a lottery—an adventure in itself given that FOIA laws vary significantly by state. In all, we sent more than 100 public record requests to lotteries for information about their winners, game odds, and investigative reports. Getting those records wasn’t simple, as we outline below.

See more details.

This should be turned into a class project for Stat 101 courses.

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Visual narrative of six asylum seekers

We often visualize migration and people movement as lines that go from point A to point B. While this can be interesting for overall trends, we lose something about the individuals leaving their home and traveling in hopes to find something some better. Federica Fragapane, in collaboration with Alex Piacentini, focuses in on six people leaving point A for point B to tell their stories.

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LEGO color scheme classifications

Nathanael Aff poked at LEGO brickset data with some text mining methods in search for recurring color schemes in LEGO sets. This is what he got.

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Computer uses wind to mine cryptocurrency and then fund climate research

HARVEST is an art piece by Julian Oliver that consists of a 4G-connected waterproof computer connected to a wind turbine. While it is powered by the wind, the computer mines for for cryptocurrency, and earnings are then cashed out as donations to climate change research organizations. Yeah.

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Semiotic, a visualization framework

Elijah Meeks released Semiotic into the wild. It’s a framework that allows quick charts but provides flexibility for custom stuff.

Semiotic is a React-based data visualization framework. You can see interactive documentation and examples here. It satisfies the need for reusable data visualization, without committing to a static set of charting types. It came out of a need for a data visualization framework that let us make simple charts quickly without committing ourselves to using only those charts. Semiotic incorporates the design and functionality of more complex data visualization methods as a response to the conversation these simple charts might begin.

Saving this for later, if just for the sketchy fills.

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Aviation tracker with depth

I’ve grown bored of maps that show commuter traffic, but for whatever reason, air traffic maps continue to seem interesting. Add this fun experiment by Jacob Wasilkowski to the list. Like any other tracker, the aviation tracker shows where planes are at any given moment, but there’s one small twist. The plane icons are sized by elevation. So if you’re staring down from above, planes that are closer to you appear larger, and those closer to the ground appear smaller.

By the way, the data comes from ADS-B Exchange if you’re interested.

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Posted by in flights, maps

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[For Members] How I Made That: Searchable Time Series Chart

When there are too many options or categories, it can be helpful to make the data searchable. Read More

Tour of Saturn through Cassini, the satellite that crashes on Friday

About two decades ago, the Cassini satellite headed towards Saturn and has been orbiting the planet for 13 years. The satellite is scheduled to crash into Saturn’s atmosphere on Friday so Nadia Drake and Brian T. Jacobs for National Geographic toured through the satellite’s best finds. This is quite the scroller and feels pretty grand.

No matter how many times it happens, it still blows my mind that satellites are sent into space for decades, reach their destination, and can still send data all the way back to us.

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Infographic design sins in meme form

Visual editor Xaquín G.V. recently used the distracted boyfriend meme to represent our attraction to novel visualization methods when a simple and visually sound method is right there at our disposal.

Then he ran with it to illustrate his professional sins as an editor for a news desk.

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Posted by in design, meme, sins

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