November 2019 RefSeq annotations: honeybee, turkey and more

In November, the NCBI Eukaryotic Genome Annotation Pipeline has released new annotations in RefSeq for the following organisms: Actinia tenebrosa (Australian red waratah sea anemone) Apis dorsata (giant honeybee) Clupea harengus (Atlantic herring) Lonchura striata domestica (Bengalese finch) Meleagris gallopavo … Continue reading

November 2019 RefSeq annotations: honeybee, turkey and more

In November, the NCBI Eukaryotic Genome Annotation Pipeline has released new annotations in RefSeq for the following organisms: Actinia tenebrosa (Australian red waratah sea anemone) Apis dorsata (giant honeybee) Clupea harengus (Atlantic herring) Lonchura striata domestica (Bengalese finch) Meleagris gallopavo … Continue reading

Datawrapper updates pricing structure, do more for free

Datawrapper, a focused web tool that makes online charts easier to put together and share, changed their pricing structure. There used to be a couple of paid tiers for individuals and small teams, but now you get more for free. And even though it’s free:

  • We won’t sell your data. Some companies make the user into the product, but this is not our business model. All data you upload to Datawrapper is treated as confidential and only belongs to your account.
  • We won’t track your readers. Your embedded charts will not contain any code that tracks you or your readers. We’ve never done that, and will continue to not do that, regardless of your plan.
  • Your charts are private. You decide when it’s time to share your charts with the world. Until you hit “Publish”, your charts are visible only to you and your team.
  • Published charts will stay online indefinitely. We will never delete or disable any of your Datawrapper visualizations that you embedded somewhere. We stand by our pledge to keep all our users’ charts online.

They continue to impress.

It wasn’t that long ago when online charting tools felt buggy and overly limited. But Datawrapper is laying some strong groundwork (and Flourish continues to build up their offerings). Instead of a one-size-fits-all, we’re seeing an application focus, which allows for more specific tools.

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Datawrapper updates pricing structure, do more for free

Datawrapper, a focused web tool that makes online charts easier to put together and share, changed their pricing structure. There used to be a couple of paid tiers for individuals and small teams, but now you get more for free. And even though it’s free:

  • We won’t sell your data. Some companies make the user into the product, but this is not our business model. All data you upload to Datawrapper is treated as confidential and only belongs to your account.
  • We won’t track your readers. Your embedded charts will not contain any code that tracks you or your readers. We’ve never done that, and will continue to not do that, regardless of your plan.
  • Your charts are private. You decide when it’s time to share your charts with the world. Until you hit “Publish”, your charts are visible only to you and your team.
  • Published charts will stay online indefinitely. We will never delete or disable any of your Datawrapper visualizations that you embedded somewhere. We stand by our pledge to keep all our users’ charts online.

They continue to impress.

It wasn’t that long ago when online charting tools felt buggy and overly limited. But Datawrapper is laying some strong groundwork (and Flourish continues to build up their offerings). Instead of a one-size-fits-all, we’re seeing an application focus, which allows for more specific tools.

Tags:

Using old ship logs as a window into the weather in the 1800s

For Reuters, Feilding Cage describes a weather time machine project by NOAA that uses old shipping logs to build climate models for the 19th century:

In the 19th and early 20th centuries, millions of weather observations were carefully made in the logbooks of ships sailing through largely uncharted waters. Written in pen and ink, the logs recorded barometric pressure, air temperature, ice conditions and other variables. Today, volunteers from a project called Old Weather are transcribing these observations, which are fed into a huge dataset at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. This “weather time machine,” as NOAA puts it, can estimate what the weather was for every day back to 1836, improving our understanding of extreme weather events and the impacts of climate change.

Consider my mind blown.

I wonder what researchers will extract from our current data streams a century from now.

Nevermind. I don’t want to know.

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Using old ship logs as a window into the weather in the 1800s

For Reuters, Feilding Cage describes a weather time machine project by NOAA that uses old shipping logs to build climate models for the 19th century:

In the 19th and early 20th centuries, millions of weather observations were carefully made in the logbooks of ships sailing through largely uncharted waters. Written in pen and ink, the logs recorded barometric pressure, air temperature, ice conditions and other variables. Today, volunteers from a project called Old Weather are transcribing these observations, which are fed into a huge dataset at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. This “weather time machine,” as NOAA puts it, can estimate what the weather was for every day back to 1836, improving our understanding of extreme weather events and the impacts of climate change.

Consider my mind blown.

I wonder what researchers will extract from our current data streams a century from now.

Nevermind. I don’t want to know.

Tags: , , ,

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Single Cell in the Cloud Codeathon, Jan 15-17 at NYGC

NCBI is pleased to announce a single-cell focused codeathon at the New York Genome Center,  January 15 -17. To apply, please complete the application form by December 30, 2019. Read on if you need more information about the event. When … Continue reading

NASA’s Juno Navigators Enable Jupiter Cyclone Discovery

Infrared image of Jupiter's south pole

When the Juno team maneuvered the spacecraft to avoid a mission-ending eclipse, they paved the way for it to discover a new cyclone at Jupiter's south pole.



✚ Moratorium On Bar Chart Races; When Impractical Visualization is More Practical (The Process #68)

The dataisbeautiful subreddit announced a moratorium on the ever popular bar chart race. The frequency of submissions that used the method got out of hand and spam made it all the less savory. Still, the method holds value. Read More