Stem cell researcher’s retraction count may near two dozen

A stem cell researcher in Japan could end up with 23 retractions after officials at his former institution confirmed that he’d committed research misconduct in nearly two dozen papers.  According to a report released last week by Akichi Gaikun University, Nobuaki Ozeki misused images, fabricated data and recycled text in 20 papers. Ozeki has had … Continue reading Stem cell researcher’s retraction count may near two dozen

New Columns added to the web BLAST Descriptions Table

In response to your requests, we have added new columns to the Descriptions Table for the web BLAST output. The new columns are  Scientific Name, Common Name, Taxid, and Accession Length. Common Name and Accession Length are now part of the default display. You can click ‘Select columns’ or ‘Manage columns’ to add or remove … Continue reading New Columns added to the web BLAST Descriptions Table

Where there are hospital staff shortages

Reporting for NPR, Sean McMinn and Selena Simmons-Duffins on staffing shortages:

On data availability:

This is the first time the federal agency has released this data, which includes limited reports going back to summer. The federal government consistently started collecting this data in July. After months of steadily trending upward, the number of hospitals reporting shortages crossed 1,000 this month and has stayed above since.

The data, however, are still incomplete. Not all hospitals that report daily status COVID-19 updates to HHS are reporting their staffing situations, so it’s impossible to tell for sure how much these numbers have increased.

The first time.

It was back in March, a few lifetimes ago, when we were talking about flattening the curve so that hospitals could provide care to those who needed it. This federal dataset is just coming out now in November? Obscene.

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Why small gatherings can be dangerous too

A small gathering of 10 people or fewer can seem like a low-risk activity, and at the individual level, it’s lower risk than going to a big birthday party. But when a lot of people everywhere are gathering, small or large, the collective risk goes up. For FiveThirtyEight, Maggie Koerth and Elena Mejía illustrate the reasoning.

The collective part is where many seem to get tripped up. “Flattening the curve” only works when everyone works together. Lower your risk, and you lower the collective risk. You’re helping others. You’re helping those you care about.

Then, collectively, we all get out of this mess.

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Psychologist’s paper retracted after Dutch national body affirms misconduct findings

A cognitive psychologist in Germany has lost one of two papers slated for retraction after her former institution found her guilty of misconduct.  In a 2019 report, Leiden University found that Lorenza Colzato, now of TU Dresden, had failed to obtain ethics ethics approval for some of her studies, manipulated her data and fabricated results … Continue reading Psychologist’s paper retracted after Dutch national body affirms misconduct findings

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Weekend reads: Stem cell trouble?; retractions of articles on a newborn’s death; facial recognition papers draw scrutiny

Before we present this week’s Weekend Reads, a question: Do you enjoy our weekly roundup? If so, we could really use your help. Would you consider a tax-deductible donation to support Weekend Reads, and our daily work? Thanks in advance. The week at Retraction Watch featured: Co-authors of paper on COVID-19 and jade amulets blame ‘the … Continue reading Weekend reads: Stem cell trouble?; retractions of articles on a newborn’s death; facial recognition papers draw scrutiny

Customize columns in NCBI’s Multiple Sequence Alignment Viewer

We’re excited to report that researchers using the NCBI Multiple Sequence Alignment Viewer (MSAV) can now add or remove columns from the alignment view. In this way, you can choose to show only columns with data relevant for analysis of the sequences in your alignment. When you arrive at an MSA alignment view, you’ll see … Continue reading Customize columns in NCBI’s Multiple Sequence Alignment Viewer

Analysis of representation in crossword puzzles

For The Pudding, Michelle McGhee analyzed representation in crossword puzzles. Some crossword publications do better than others.

As of December 2019, The USA Today puzzle is edited by Erik Agard, a 27-year old crossword champ who told me, “bringing some balance on the representation front is something I actively try to do.” A prominent crossword blogger called USA Today’s puzzle “the most interesting, innovative, and provocative daily crossword” out right now. Let’s take a look at how USA Today, and other publications, are taking a puzzle that’s been called too old, too white, too male, and changing it up.

The story also comes with playable, data-generated puzzles so that you can feel the difference over decades.

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December 2 Webinar: Using the new Read assembly and Annotation Pipeline Tool (RAPT) to assemble and annotate microbial genomes

Join us December 2 to learn how to use the Read assembly and Annotation Pipeline Tool (RAPT). With RAPT, you can assemble and annotate a microbial genome right out of the sequencing machine! Provide the short genomic reads or an SRA run on input, and get back the sequence annotated with coding and protein coding … Continue reading December 2 Webinar: Using the new Read assembly and Annotation Pipeline Tool (RAPT) to assemble and annotate microbial genomes